5 Gallon Boils

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indybrewer

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I am currently doing 2.5 gallon boils as the kits from Austin Home Brew say in there intructions. I am hooked on the kits from them and have recently purchased a propane burner so I can brew in the garage. Is there anything I need to do differently to do a full 5 gallon boil or just stick to the instructions only with more water? Thanks for the help.

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RICLARK

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Do you have a big enough pot for 5 gallon boils? Also do the kits you are using have steeping grains? if so The steeping grains probably need to be steeped in 5 gallons and after that you could probably add more water and start your full boil.
 

eriktlupus

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you'll need a way to cool the wort, moving 40+lbs of hot water/sugar isn't easy.

you can make an easy IC with a 25' fridge water kit, a faucet adapter and some hose clamps
 
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indybrewer

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I have a 30qt. pot which I believe is big enough. Yes all the kits have steeping grains. So you are saying start with the 2.5 gallons and steep, then add the rest of the water and bring to a boil and add the LME and go from there, correct? I have a copper chiller already also to answer the previous post.
 

RICLARK

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indybrewer said:
I have a 30qt. pot which I believe is big enough. Yes all the kits have steeping grains. So you are saying start with the 2.5 gallons and steep, then add the rest of the water and bring to a boil and add the LME and go from there, correct? I have a copper chiller already also to answer the previous post.
That is what I would do and have done for my Oberon Clone I steeped it in 1 1/2 Gal and then Topped it off brought to a boil and added my extract and it came out perfect in color and taste, So try that.
 
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I steep in the 6 gallons of water, and generally speaking, and I am not refined enough to notice the difference. But Erik is right, you'll need an immersion chiller.
 

Skunkyhops

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I have been doing 5 gal boils and steeping in the entire 5 gallons. I dont have an immersion chiller but i did still manage to cool my wort from boiling to 75 degrees in 15 minutes on sat. with an ice bath (actually snow and water but same difference). Ive never used a wort chiller but from what i have heard it takes about 10-15 minutes to chill the wort? I lightly stirred the wort while it was in the ice bath, not sure if it helped but I would assume so...
 

TexLaw

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A 30qt kettle is big enough to do a five gallon boil. In fact, it's big enough to do an even larger boil, but you just have to keep an eye out for boilovers.

Remember to also adjust your hop additions for the lower gravity of the boil.


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missing link

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using beer smith to go from 2.5 gallon boil vs 5 gallon boil, you hop additions will need to change. I think you get better hop utilization when you boil all 5 gallons. If you use the same amount of hops as the 2.5 gallon recipe, you may get a slightly hoppier beer.

Linc
 

Nurmey

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There was an article in BYO magazine about kicking up your extract kits. Two of the tips are Steep Small and Boil Big. I've had great results following this advice.
The whole article is still on their website http://***********/feature/1175.html


Brew Your Own
Kick Up Your Kit
by Marlon Lang
Mar, 2004

Tip 3. Steep small. Does your kit instruct you to steep your specialty grains in the full amount of brewing water? This is a good way to get the most flavor from the grains, but itâs also a good way to extract harsh tannins from the grain. For a better steep, place your crushed grains in a nylon or muslin steeping bag and add only enough water to your brewpot to cover the grains. Steep the grains at temperatures anywhere from 130ö170 ¡F (54ö77 ¡C). When you are done, lift the grain bag out and let it drip for 15 seconds or so. If you steep the specialty grains in a separate small pot, you can be heating the bulk of your brewing water in your big brewpot during the steep. Just add the ãgrain teaä from the little pot to your big pot when itâs ready ÷ in about 30 minutes.

Tip 8. Boil Bigger . . . or at Least Better. Just as thereâs more than one way to peel garlic, thereâs more than one way to boil your wort. Letâs run down your options.

A full wort boil: My definition of a full wort boil is boiling the entire volume, less evaporation losses, of wort that will go into the fermenter. A full wort boil lets you extract more bitterness from your hops and darkens your wort less. If you can manage a full wort boil, this is the way to go. To boil your full wort, you either need a pot big enough to hold your entire wort or to boil the wort in shifts. If your boiling pot is not large enough to hold all your wort, plus a few gallons of headspace for foaming, see Chris Colbyâs ãTexas Two-Step Methodä article (October 2003 BYO) for a way to produce your wort in two steps.

Add the extract late: Even if youâre saddled with a small brew pot, you can still tweak some boil variables to get a better boil. If your kit contains liquid malt extract, you can add the bulk of it at or near the end of the boil. To do this, add one or two pounds of your malt extract to the kettle at the beginning of your boil, but withhold the rest. Add your hops at the times specified in the recipe. With 15 minutes left in the boil, turn off the heat and stir in the remainder of the extract. Resume heating for the remaining 15 minutes, but donât worry if the wort doesnât return to a boil. See Steve Baderâs ãBoil the Hops, not the Extract,ä (October 2002 BYO) for another variation on this theme, in which you add the liquid malt extract at knockout.

Adding the extract late lets you brew pale ales that are actually pale, not red. Plus, you donât have to add a whole hopper of hops to get the degree of bitterness you want. This advice runs counter to much homebrew lore, but many liquid malt extracts are already boiled during their production. Remember the mantra, ãDonât fix what ainât broke?ä In this case, it translates to ãDonât boil what donât need boiling.ä
 
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indybrewer

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TexLaw said:
A 30qt kettle is big enough to do a five gallon boil. In fact, it's big enough to do an even larger boil, but you just have to keep an eye out for boilovers.

Remember to also adjust your hop additions for the lower gravity of the boil.


TL
I am new to brewing, the next batch will be my sixth. My question to your comment is will I need more hops? If so will one of the brewing softwares out there adjust this for me. I am going to try the full boil with Austin Home Brews Double Chocolate Stout this Saturday. Thanks again for eveyones help. As you can see I am new at brewing but I am hooked and hope to be switching from strictly extract to all grain soon. This forum is great and feeds my addiction. Thanks.:mug:
 

TexLaw

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Actually, you need less hops. As your wort gravity lowers, your hop utilization rises. Yes, any decent brewing software will factor in wort gravity when calculating IBUs, so you can compare apples to apples.

Have fun!


TL
 
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