2 row vs 6 row

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HairyDogBrewing

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It describes the shape of the grain head.
2 row heads are flat and 6 row are more spiral.

2 row is preferred for brewing because of more uniform kernel size,
higher yield, and lower protein.
6 row grows better in the US and has higher enzymatic activity.
The extra enzymes can be used to convert cereal adjuncts.
 
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MikeFlynn74

MikeFlynn74

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Ahh so adding some 6 row can help when you have a high level of non base grains. Nice.

Any good reccomendations for use and amounts?
 

HP_Lovecraft

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6-row also has a stronger flavor.

The original reason that BMC used rice/corn was that those adjuncts mellowed the sharp 6-row flavor, and made the final product taste more like a light German 2-row lager.

I'm sure that the fact that 6-row was cheaper, and the rice/corn was cheaper had no part in the equation? ;)

You can find enzyme ratings for all the base grains that will tell you how much non-malt they can convert, but a typical American lager recipe is:

7lbs 6-row
2lbs flaked corn
30 IBU's hops

nick
 

srm775

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egolla said:
It describes the shape of the grain head.
2 row heads are flat and 6 row are more spiral.

2 row is preferred for brewing because of more uniform kernel size,
higher yield, and lower protein.
6 row grows better in the US and has higher enzymatic activity.
The extra enzymes can be used to convert cereal adjuncts.
2 row/6 row refers to the malt grains per stalk. 6 row has a higher yield and is what is used by the larger breweries because it's cheaper.
 

ChrisKennedy

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Not only does 6row have higher diastatic power than 2row, it has higher nitrogen levels, which help compensate for a higher percentage of rice or corn. Low nitrogen levels can lead to increased diacetyl production and other fermentation problems.
 

z987k

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HP_Lovecraft said:
6-row also has a stronger flavor.

The original reason that BMC used rice/corn was that those adjuncts mellowed the sharp 6-row flavor, and made the final product taste more like a light German 2-row lager.

I'm sure that the fact that 6-row was cheaper, and the rice/corn was cheaper had no part in the equation? ;)

You can find enzyme ratings for all the base grains that will tell you how much non-malt they can convert, but a typical American lager recipe is:

7lbs 6-row
2lbs flaked corn
30 IBU's hops

nick
what American lager are you talking about? 30ibu's?

Seriously, if there is one, I might try it.
 

Tonedef131

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Would 6-row be helpful in brewing a wheat beer? I am putting together a wheat beer recipe that will be 50/50 wheat/barley. I have never used 6-row but would the husks help in preventing stuck sparges?

I would just try it out and see how well it does, but I fear a boilover with wheat and 6-row being the only grains I use.
 
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