1st Time Kegging, Head but no Carbonation

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Rothman

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I have had my keg setup running for about 2 weeks now. I set my kegs at 12 psi at about 43 degrees F. My kegs were cold when I started them on the gas but I'm still not getting any carbonation. I do however get a nice head on my beers. I'm using cobra taps on the end of 5 feet of 3/16 tubing from the keg connection. I open the taps all the way to get my pour but i've tried other rates of pouring.

What could be going on? I'm pretty tired of having all this flat beer around!

Thanks,
Adam
 

TipsyDragon

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question. how can you get head from a flat beer???

my first thought is to crank up the pressure for a couple of days.
 
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Rothman

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I wish I could tell you. I think it is pouring with some carbonation but is all coming out of solution during the pour. I'm not sure what is the problem, I was hoping some one here has some advice.

Adam
 

Yooper

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I have a couple of thoughts. First, 43 degrees can be a bit warm for 12 psi. http://www.ebrew.com/primarynews/ct_carbonation_chart.htm Try 15 psi. I like most of my American ales at 2.5 volumes of co2 or so. Also, it can take up to three weeks to be fully carbonated, so you still have some time to go. Lastly, those 5' beer lines are too short. Oh, they'll work ok but they will be short enough that you'll get some turbulence and "knock out" some of the co2. That will create head, but not many bubbles in the beer. I'd go with longer lines. I'd start with about 8' and see if that helps (and it will!)
 

bmckee56

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Three weeks is about what my beers take to develop the carbonation effect I look for. Different style glasses will give different bubble effects too. I notice when I pour into a regular pint glass, I get less bubbles than I do when I pour into a pilsner glass. Also something to consider is how you are washing the glasses. If you use dish detergent, it can effect the head and the bubbles in your glass. I rinse my glasses with a combination of very hot water and a small amount of vinegar in a tub. The vinegar strips away any soap residue that may still be present on the glass. Glasses come out spot free and I have not noticed any after taste at all Just my thoughts.

Salute! :mug:
 
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