1st time brewer needs help with yeast

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Hogs

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I just recently made my first ever batch of home brew after reading about it. I didn't follow any recipe as I like to start experimenting right away. It was a 10 gallon batch and I used Nottingham dry ale yeast. I used the yeast because it got great reviews as being a fast fermenting, versatile, neutral yeast. I followed the directions and re hydrated it for 15 min in in water at 34 degrees. then mixed it up and let it sit for 5 minutes. then I slowly added it to my wort which was at 69 degrees. I added it slowly mixing the wort as I added it. Its been 3 hours now but there does not appear to be any fermenting activity close to the airlock or stopper. Im not using a see through primary fermenter so I cant see whats going on but it does not appear to be fermenting. Should I lift the lid to check, do nothing, or add a different strain of yeast. Im worried that my yeast could have been dead.
 

RmikeVT

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10g probably needed two packs of yeast. 3 hours isn't nearly enough time. I bet you will start seeing activity 24-48 hours. Also, airlock isn't always the best way to measure fermentation. If you don't have a perfect seal it won't bubble as you expect it to.
 

RmikeVT

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Also -- keep those ferm temps in the 60-68 range. Ferm temps can also be 5-10 degrees above ambient do to the energy released by the yeast.
 

tre9er

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34 degrees celsius? Sounds fine. Wait 3-4 days before jumping the gun on the fermentation starting.
 
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Hogs

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Thanks That was helpful. Ill wait 24 hours then and see what happens. I did use the equivalent of 2 packets of yeast for the batch sorry that I wasn't clear on that. . As for the temperature, its hard for me to get it to the low 60s during the day as the weather is getting warm here. During the day, the air temp in the room will usually be 68-69, and at night around 64. I could put it in the tub and use a cold water bath but then I won't really know what temperature it will be at. But I was planning to tinker with temp control and alcohol percentage in future brews, for my 1st brew I just want to make sure it comes out decent.
Also in case I decide to replace the yeast later tomorrow if nothing is happening, the only other yeast I have is a belgian trappist ale yeast from white labs. Could this be ok for an american pale ale or would it come out awful. ( just in case I have to put new yeast in tomorrow)
 
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Hogs

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34 degrees celsius? Sounds fine. Wait 3-4 days before jumping the gun on the fermentation starting.
Yea sorry was not clear there either. yea celsius. Directions said to rehydrate with water at 30 to 35 degrees celsius. so I boiled 190 ml of water to 34 C then added my yeast to it.
 

tre9er

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Thanks That was helpful. Ill wait 24 hours then and see what happens. I did use the equivalent of 2 packets of yeast for the batch sorry that I wasn't clear on that. . As for the temperature, its hard for me to get it to the low 60s during the day as the weather is getting warm here. During the day, the air temp in the room will usually be 68-69, and at night around 64. I could put it in the tub and use a cold water bath but then I won't really know what temperature it will be at. But I was planning to tinker with temp control and alcohol percentage in future brews, for my 1st brew I just want to make sure it comes out decent.
Also in case I decide to replace the yeast later tomorrow if nothing is happening, the only other yeast I have is a belgian trappist ale yeast from white labs. Could this be ok for an american pale ale or would it come out awful. ( just in case I have to put new yeast in tomorrow)
You'll be fine. You can put it in a water bath with a towel over it and a fan blowing on it, that is a good way to drop it a few degrees during the day, but not drastically.
 
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Hogs

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I forgot to mention I did pour the water and yeast into a sanitized measuring cup before I added it to the wort. Could that have killed the yeast?. Sorry if these questions sound stupid but Im pretty new to all this. Im sure its probably fine and Im panicking for no reaon.
 

TipsyDragon

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An airlock is NOT a fermentation indicator it's a pressure release valve. If your brewing in a bucket you may never see any activity in the airlock because the CO2 is escaping from around the lid. Put your good ear next to the fermenter. If you hear a hissing sound then you have fermentation. I would suggest walking away from the fermenter and forgetting about it for the next 2-3 weeks.
 

adamdillabo

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Did you aerate?

Pretty ambitious doing ten on your first run.
What was your recipe?

3 hours is nothing compared to the 3 weeks your going to wait. Bottle or keg?
 

Rbeckett

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Best advice is put it in the tub, toss a shirt over it and run the fan. You wont be in any danger of chilling the yeast. Then walk away from the tub and only go in there to pee. After 2 or 3 weeks, pop the top off the bucket carefully and get a sample to test the gravity. If the grav is where you expect it bottle it up and put it in the fridge to age. after a couple or even three weeks, pop one and enjoy!!!! Brewing is all about patience and being able to resist temptation for some period of time. So keep them grubby dick beaters off the pail and be patient.....

Wheelchair Bob
 

hector

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Is this a whole 10-Gallon-Batch or two 5 Gallons ?

I'm asking this because 10 Gallons is a big batch and it takes relatively long for the temperature of the wort to go up .

As you said , you re-hydrated the yeast at 34 C and added to the wort which was at around 20 C .

14 Degrees sudden drop in temperature does not make the yeast so happy . You should have added small

amounts of the wort to the yeast slurry before pitching .

Nottingham is a fast fermenting yeast and it must show you some signs within 6-12 Hours after pitching .

I wouldn't wait longer than 24 Hours . Otherwise , you will probably get off-flavors .

Always keep the fermentation temperature at 60-65 F when you're using Nottingham .

Hector
 
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Hogs

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Did you aerate?

Pretty ambitious doing ten on your first run.
What was your recipe?

3 hours is nothing compared to the 3 weeks your going to wait. Bottle or keg?
Thanks yea when I get interested in something I try to go all out. I aslo had this awesome almost brand new 14 gallon italian brewing pot that my friend basically gave me for free. It retails for $900. So I wanted to make the most of it. I also hat following recipes so I made my own for better or worse I just want to experiment and improve my own recipes, (thats how great recipes get invented I hope). Plus i dont care if the first batch tastes bad if its alcoholic Ill drink it anyway. I did aerate but only slightly because the specific strain of yeast said it was very active and not to aerate it on the instructions. Anyway here is my recipe.

1. I Boiled water with 1lb crushed belgian abbey ale barley for flavor till 170 degrees (forgot brand)

2. I used 3lb liquid malt extract Belgian abbey ale (again forgot brand).

3. Used 8 lbs liquid Muntons malt extract (amber).

4. Used 3lbs Muntons dry amber malt extract

5. Used 1lb Muntons light malt extract

Hops

at fist boil I used bittering hops, tettnager and saaz 2oz each

then flavoring cascade 2.2 oz flavoring

then aroma 1 oz williamete

yeast .74 oz nottingham ale yeast

Its purely an experimental recipe
 
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Hogs

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Is this a whole 10-Gallon-Batch or two 5 Gallons ?

I'm asking this because 10 Gallons is a big batch and it takes relatively long for the temperature of the wort to go up .

As you said , you re-hydrated the yeast at 34 C and added to the wort which was at around 20 C .

14 Degrees sudden drop in temperature does not make the yeast so happy . You should have added small

amounts of the wort to the yeast slurry before pitching .

Nottingham is a fast fermenting yeast and it must show you some signs within 6-12 Hours after pitching .

I wouldn't wait longer than 24 Hours . Otherwise , you will probably get off-flavors .

Always keep the fermentation temperature at 60-65 F when you're using Nottingham .

Hector
Thanks man, yea I think I misunderstood the directions, I added the yeast slowly to the wort instead of the other way around. I may have to add another yeast. They did say a difference of 10 degrees C or more shocks the yeast. I did 10 gallons all at once. I will try to get temp consistent at around 64 with a cold water bath. Thanks though that was very helpful. Would you recomend against using a different yeast strain. As the only one I have left is the belgian abbey ale from white labs.
 

hector

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I will try to get temp consistent at around 64 with a cold water bath. Thanks though that was very helpful. Would you recomend against using a different yeast strain. As the only one I have left is the belgian abbey ale from white labs.
I'm not sure that you are able to control the temperature of such a huge Batch precisely .

It would have been much easier if you had split your batch into two 5 Gallons .

I've never used the strain you mentioned from Whitelabs , so I can not say anything about it .

However , I would pitch more Nottingham , but this time with no SHOCK !

Hector
 

strambo

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I have never re-hydrated dry yeast or worried about "shock"...I just pitch the packs directly into the bucket when the wort is 70 deg or less. No issues in about 2 dozen batches, I use mostly US-05 and S-04, OGs ranging from 1.035-1.092 (pitching 2 packs when needed).

You should see signs of fermentation today and shouldn't have to do anything. Just placing the primary in the tub with water will really help with temp control. I have an 18 gal plastic laundry tub I stick my primaries in, cheap and easy.
 

hector

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I have never re-hydrated dry yeast or worried about "shock"...I just pitch the packs directly into the bucket when the wort is 70 deg or less.
It's because when the dry yeast is re-hydrated , it will be much sensitive to temperature differentiation .

Besides , "Fermentis" ( the manufacturer of US-05 and S-04 ) says that you can pitch dry yeast directly in the fermentation vessel if the temperature is above 69 F .

So , there is no wonder as you did so and had no issues .

Hector
 
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Hogs

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The yeast definitely started going today. Was a false alarm. And when it started going,it got going pretty vigorously. if anything, I think Im gonna use less yeast next time. It smells wonderful, almost like I want to drink it right now. Great color too.
 

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