1st batch: Cloudy after transfer to secondary

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Duck_Hunter_117

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Hi all. I'm just getting started in brewing and this forum has been a great help. I have my first batch in the secondary fermenter right now and am not sure if I have an issue or not.

I'm brewing a Scottish Ale with a friend that has previously brewed to help me along. (http://www.greatfermentations.com/downloads/instructions/beerkits/12PennyScottishAle.pdf). The primary seemed to finish after the first week but there was still some yeast on top. I let it sit a few more days and still had yeast on top, but no airlock activity and the beer was at final gravity. Readings on the 11th and 13th day were identical and in line with expectations.

At that time the beer was very clear and the sample I took had a pretty good taste to it. I started transferring to the secondary and immediately the beer became cloudy. I'm now at day 5 in the secondary and it hasn't cleared up at all.

Everything was sanitized with Star San and I was careful not to stir up any trub or introduce oxygen during transfer. Any thoughts? Is this normal?

I know secondary isn't necessary, but being my 1st batch I'm wanting to go through the "full" process so I can note any deficiencies.
 

d3track

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Was the primary a bucket? You may have kicked up some trub in the transfer that you can now see much more clearly in the carboy.

If you have the ability to cold crash, this would be a good time for it.
 

thekraken

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I know secondary isn't necessary, but being my 1st batch I'm wanting to go through the "full" process so I can note any deficiencies.
More than that it could potentially be counterproductive.

I say don't worry about it, if it's not clear then it's not clear, you still got beer! Congrats on your first batch btw. If it doesn't eventually clear up in secondary, it may clear up in the bottle when you chill it in the fridge. If it's still hazy, and this bothers you, try using some finings such as whirlfloc in your next batch.
 

eadavis80

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Yeah, my guess is you siphoned out some excess yeast from the bottom of your primary when you made the transfer to secondary. When you're ready to bottle, I'd suggest moving your secondary to its bottling location the night BEFORE you bottle. That way, if you stir up any yeast in the secondary when you move it, at least you'll be giving that yeast another 12+ hours to resettle and not get into your bottling bucket. IF some does, NBD - it will settle out in the bottle.
 

1977Brewer

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Here's a really nice comparison. Three days in the bottle, unchilled, no cold crash, no secondary. Didn't get the sediment in the second pic, but at this point it's what I consider slight. Perhaps a little more than a commercial bottle conditioned brew, probably on the level of SNPA.

BOTTLE 001.jpg


BOTTLE 002.jpg
 

1977Brewer

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Yeah, my guess is you siphoned out some excess yeast from the bottom of your primary when you made the transfer to secondary. When you're ready to bottle, I'd suggest moving your secondary to its bottling location the night BEFORE you bottle. That way, if you stir up any yeast in the secondary when you move it, at least you'll be giving that yeast another 12+ hours to resettle and not get into your bottling bucket. IF some does, NBD - it will settle out in the bottle.
This too. Move it to your racking psition a day before you rack. If you can, leave it in the bottling bucket for an hour or so before you bottle too.
 

madscientist451

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Is it cold where you live? Put the carboy out in the cold for a few days and see if the cloudiness drops out. Beer can go below 32 without freezing, but too cold and you risk breaking the carboy if its glass so be careful. If it doesn't clear up, don't worry about it.
 
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Duck_Hunter_117

Duck_Hunter_117

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Thanks for the replies. I did move the primary, glass Carboy, to its transfer location the night before to give extra time to settle. I tried to be careful, but probably did get some extra yeast. I'm just surprised at how cloudy it got and then that it hasn't cleared/settled at all.

When would be a good time to cold crash? I will be kegging if that makes a difference.
 
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