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Imperial Stout 1848 Barclay Perkins Imperial Brown Stout 1st ever Imperial Stout

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Mar 22, 2019
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Location
HUmbodlt County
Recipe Type
All Grain
Yeast
Wyeast 1099 Whitbread Yeast 2 packs
Yeast Starter
2.5 Liter
Batch Size (Gallons)
5.5
Original Gravity
1.097
Final Gravity
1.024
Boiling Time (Minutes)
120
Color
SRM 44
This brew is from Ron Pattinsons Homebrewers Guide to Vintage Beer, which focuses on British brewing recipes from the last 200 years. I am curious if anyone else have brewed any of these historic beers and if they have any advice?

https://www.brewersfriend.com/homeb...-barclay-perkins-ibst-1st-ever-imperial-stout

I emailed Ron Pattinson and he responded, this is one of the oldest known recipes for the Barclay Perkins Imperial IBSt which was originally sent to Catherine the Great in 1781. Before this version which uses 6 lbs of brown malt, brown malt was diastatic and could convert itself without added base malt so the recipes had brown but no base malt. The only available versions of brown malt are no longer diastatic, and have been that way for close to 200 years. So given today's malt this is one of the first versions us modern homebrewers can brew.

I made a mistake on my efficiency in Brewers Friend I had it set too high for such a big stout, I pulled closer to 65% efficiency, so I added the sugar to compensate. The Lyles Golden Syrup is a very traditional British product very similar to the light colored invert syrups popular in British brewing the early 1900's.

Next I plan to brew Ron Pattinsons recipe for the 1915 Courage Imperial Stout.

Grain Bill
15 lb Crisp - Finest Maris Otter 38 3 58%
6 lb United Kingdom - Brown 32 65 23.2%
2.75 lb United Kingdom - Amber 32 27 10.6%
0.75 lb United Kingdom - Black Patent 27 525 2.9%
0.75 lb Brown Sugar 45 15 2.9%
0.6 lb Lyles Golden Syrup - Clear (0L) 32 0 2.3%

Hops
Amount Variety Type Use Time
5 oz East Kent Goldings Pellet Boil 90 min
5 oz East Kent Goldings Pellet Boil 60 min
6 oz East Kent Goldings Pellet Boil 15 min

Fermentables
Amount Fermentable PPG °L Bill %
15 lb Crisp - Finest Maris Otter 38 3 58%
6 lb United Kingdom - Brown 32 65 23.2%
2.75 lb United Kingdom - Amber 32 27 10.6%
0.75 lb United Kingdom - Black Patent 27 525 2.9%
0.75 lb Brown Sugar 45 15 2.9%
0.6 lb Candi Syrup - Belgian Candi Syrup - Clear (0L) 32 0 2.3%
25.85 lb Total

Hops
Amount Variety Type AA Use Time IBU
5 oz East Kent Goldings Pellet 5 Boil 90 min 65.5
5 oz East Kent Goldings Pellet 5 Boil 60 min 61.23
6 oz East Kent Goldings Pellet 5 Boil 15 min 36.46

Hops Summary
Amount Variety Type AA
16 oz East Kent Goldings Pellet 5
16 oz Total

Mash Guidelines
Amount Description Type Temp Time
8.5 gal
Infusion 151 °F 60 min
6 gal
Sparge 170 °F 30 min
Starting Mash Thickness: 1.2 qt/lb

Other Ingredients
Amount Name Type Use Time
8.5 g Calcium Chloride Water Agt Mash 1 hr.
3 g Gypsum Water Agt Mash 1 hr.
1.5 g Baking Soda Water Agt Mash 1 hr.

Yeast
Wyeast - British Ale 1098
Amount:
2
Attenuation (custom):
71%
Fermentation Temp:
68 °F

Tasting:
This beer is still fermenting, but I would describe early tastes as different from any imperial stout I have ever tasted, and I consider myself a stout connoisseur. The brown malt is really roasty in an almost a smokey way. While the hops, almost a pound of East Kent Goldings, combine with the bitter acridness of black patent malt and lend a sharp supporting note to a smooth syrupy body.
 
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kevin58

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I brew Ron's recipes all the time. Most turn out very well. Others are basically nothing more than a SMaSH recipe and as such are on the bland side. For that reason I tend to look to the ones like this with a bit more complexity in the bill.

I'm not sure where you got the sugars from though. I'm looking at the book and the recipe doesn't have any of those. If I were going to add any kind of sugar like that I would add invert... probably #3 or even #4. With this recipe however I would brew it as is

Since Ron doesn't provide efficiency numbers you will need to use your own, known efficiency and adjust the grain bill to reach the OG. Using Beersmith and my known efficiency I had to reduce the grain bill slightly to reach 1.101 OG as listed in the recipe.

This one has definitely been on my radar to reproduce but right now I'm playing with several of Ron's Porter recipes. The latest is in this forum in the Specialty, Fruit, Historical, Other Homebrew Recipes section. https://www.homebrewtalk.com/forum/threads/1880-whitbread-porter.666707/

Let us know how it turns out. Maybe brew it again without those sugars and compare the two.
 

kevin58

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If you're buying two packs of yeast then I'd mix them - one of 1098 and one of 1099 would be an obvious blend.
In his book, Ron Pattinson actually listed both of those in the recipe. It does take two packs and a 2.5 liter starter to get the needed cell count.
 
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Boozy Mcboozerson
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In his book, Ron Pattinson actually listed both of those in the recipe. It does take two packs and a 2.5 liter starter to get the needed cell count.
If you're buying two packs of yeast then I'd mix them - one of 1098 and one of 1099 would be an obvious blend.
Good advice! this is my first beer from Rons book and I wanted to make sure I didnt have any fermentation problems. I noticed that he recommends the wyeast 1098 for his bigger stouts. Flavor wise Whitbread sonds more interesting
 
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Boozy Mcboozerson
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Either of you guys try that Wyeast 1469 West Yorkshire, the Timmy Thomas strain? Ron Pattinson recommends this for his Courage stouts
 

kevin58

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Either of you guys try that Wyeast 1469 West Yorkshire, the Timmy Thomas strain? Ron Pattinson recommends this for his Courage stouts
I have not. I have substituted Imperial Pub A09 with good results however. I don't think you need to worry about fermentation problems using modern yeasts. If you look at the attenuation figures of these 19th century beers they are all low compared to today. Just make sure you are pitching enough healthy yeast and you'll do well.
 

cyberbackpacker

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I use 1469 all the time-- it is great. And a true top cropper-- about 18 hours after pitching there is a full head of krausen for me. I am able to skim off the gunk, and collect plenty of clean slurry for a future batch.

:mug:
 

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