Quantcast

Search results

HomeBrewTalk.com - Beer, Wine, Mead, & Cider Brewing Discussion Community.

Help Support Homebrew Talk:

  1. McKnuckle

    Question regarding pressure fermenters.

    When fermentation is done, you will have a hard time cranking up the pressure to anything. :) You'll only achieve or increase pressure when fermentation is actively producing CO2. That's the trick to spunding - containing the CO2 while its still being produced, but not too early or too late.
  2. McKnuckle

    Temperature control

    There is nothing wrong with keeping a tighter tolerance on the control, other than - as you mentioned - wear on the electronics. You can definitely relax, though, about a degree or two of drift. In fact, even in the fermenter itself there's likely to be some temperature heterogeneity. I also...
  3. McKnuckle

    Temperature control

    I use a +1ºF delta from the controller's set point. This means if the controller is set to 63º, the beer will warm up to 64º before the cooling kicks in. It can over-shoot a bit and drop to, say, 62.5º. I may have that inadvertently set now that I think about it, but it's hardly a problem. I...
  4. McKnuckle

    Did I kill my yeast?

    Folks, read the post. SG was 1.012 and this was a diacetyl rest, not pitching temperature or primary fermentation. And there is no way in hell that lager yeast DIES at 82F. In fact, maximum growth temp is 34C or 93F. Saccharomyces pastorianus - an overview | ScienceDirect Topics
  5. McKnuckle

    Did I kill my yeast?

    The yeast is not at all dead; quite the contrary! It should love that temperature, which is 82F. Of course it's not so good for your beer. Luckily though, or at least hopefully, it is well past the point in your fermentation schedule where such a warm temp would produce off flavors and ruin...
  6. McKnuckle

    Lager fermentation

    Have a look at how German homebrewers typically filter out boil trub on the way to the fermenter. Fast forward to 17:30 in this video (he's a bit wordy and I don't understand German, so...) Whirlpool in the kettle, then run-off through a filter bag into the fermenter.
  7. McKnuckle

    Lager fermentation

    Just a quick comment that it's called wort without an "h" at the end. What you might get is a ball valve for that port and a pickup tube inside. Then you can practice techniques such as whirlpooling to contain the heaviest trub in the center of the kettle. Also on the inside you might install...
  8. McKnuckle

    How Much To Keep?

    It depends how long this has been sitting, but it looks like the good, suspended yeast is in the lighter, opaque brown section in the (roughly) middle. Hurry though, and pour it off into a fresh jar or two, so it can settle. If you wait too long, it will settle on top of the trub, making it...
  9. McKnuckle

    Lager fermentation problem?

    You shouldn't be worrying about gravity testing this beer for at least a week. Presence of a krausen is indicative of fermentation, and it's a lager yeast fermenting in the 50s - it's doing exactly what is expected. Don't pitch more and try to keep your hands off of it entirely. Are you...
  10. McKnuckle

    Fermzilla Flat Bottom Fermenter

    Perhaps a bit off-topic for this thread, but to alleviate any confusion: Here's a pic of my modified 3 gallon corny keg with a ball valve on the bottom. Inside, there's a barb attached to a short length of flexible silicone tubing and a float ball. The float starts out submerged in the beer...
  11. McKnuckle

    Yeast washing layers

    ^I do the same, only I drain the kettle without aeration into a holding vessel and let it settle in a temp-controlled fridge set for pitching temp. Anywhere from 2 hours to overnight later, I'll siphon off the trub into the fermenter, aerating only at that point. I do this not only to harvest...
  12. McKnuckle

    Secondary Fermenting

    It is actually NOT deemed a big no-no to bottle from the primary without using a secondary; au contraire - it is the most common, best practice to do it that way. Yeast are not taken away from the beer in enough number to affect carbonation. It worked fine for you because it works fine...
  13. McKnuckle

    Fermzilla Flat Bottom Fermenter

    The ball valve is installed on the bottom to use for gravity transfers.
  14. McKnuckle

    Fermzilla Flat Bottom Fermenter

    I might be a little odd, but I appreciate ball lock connections because I can more easily vent fermentation CO2 into the serving keg to purge it. That's my typical practice. But then I would rather rack the beer using simple gravity, which is where the spigot comes in. Fermenters on the...
  15. McKnuckle

    Fermzilla Flat Bottom Fermenter

    This one is cool, too - another in a series of these pressure capable, plastic fermenters with ball lock compatible hardware. I still wish these fermenters had bottom draining spigots, though. It would be the best of both worlds. You could ferment without the need to force the beer up and out...
  16. McKnuckle

    Yeast washing layers

    I guess I was just trying to help the OP with his yeast. I'm not arguing for the need or lack thereof to do it in the first place, although I prefer to remove most of the trub since to me it's easy.
  17. McKnuckle

    Yeast washing layers

    Understood. At the very least, you'll have the two substances largely separated and can make a call. I know it works well when the slurry is not already ultra cold and well-settled, i.e. when it's fresh out of the fermenter. You might also have a clearer result with a larger volume of water...
  18. McKnuckle

    Yeast washing layers

    ^It's not, really, especially if you re-use the yeast relatively soon. But trub is a four letter word around here, isn't it? And sometimes, even often, most of the slurry is trub.
  19. McKnuckle

    Yeast washing layers

    Just remember, don't look for clean lines other than (most of) what settles to the bottom in that first 15-20 minutes. Trust the process, and pour off the remaining stuff into a fresh container. Then you'll be able to compare the jars and hopefully recognize the yeast. Good luck. ;)
  20. McKnuckle

    Yeast washing layers

    Jim, That's the point - it's hard to tell for sure after the layers have cleanly settled. You are better off judging by the rate of settling, which you can only determine by performing the procedure in a brief period of time, as described. Take one of your jars, shake it up, and do what I...
Top