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Peter L.

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The Brew Barn - The Legend Continues!

It's been a while since we've had an update on the Brew Barn. For those of you not familiar with the project, our member Peter L.(Scele) has set out to build his brew space from scratch, and we've been lucky to see the progress along the way. To catch up please read parts 1, 2, 3, and 4. *** First of all, I'd like to say that I'm sorry for how long it's taken to get this article up. I've had a busy couple of months and just couldn't seem to get it done. So, last time we did a brew barn article I'd just gotten it up and running ex power. Well, I got the electrician to come by and install the needed electrical outlets and fuse box. I also added a few fridges and some finishing touches to the brewing space: [/hide]

The Brew Barn - Walls, Paint, Tiles? Check!

So, in the last article I detailed parts of the wall build and the concrete. To catch you up here is how it looked after we put in the concrete and put up the wall: [/hide]

The Brew Barn - Walls, Paint, Tiles? Check!

So, in the last article I detailed parts of the wall build and the concrete. To catch you up here is how it looked after we put in the concrete and put up the wall: [/hide]

The Brew Barn - Part the Third

This is part 3 of an on-going series. For part one click here. For part two click here. So, in the last series I went through prepping the floor for a concrete delivery. Just to catch you up, this is how it looked: [/hide]

The Brew Barn - Part the Third

This is part 3 of an on-going series. For part one click here. For part two click here. So, in the last series I went through prepping the floor for a concrete delivery. Just to catch you up, this is how it looked: [/hide]

The Brew Barn - The Adventure Continues

This is part 2 in an on-going series, click [here] for part 1. After letting the room dry for a few days after the washing, I went to work using a scraper to get rid of any loose paint so that I wouldn't have a "paint comes off after 35 minutes" situation. I did get most of the loose paint using the power-washer though, so it was quick work. I also got a concrete spackling paste to fill up some of the smaller holes left by nails, bolts and such through the 60 years this building has been in use. It's too soon to tell how well it worked but it was easy to apply and I was able to paint over it within a few hours of putting it on. I was going to paint the room regular white, but after talking to a few people I decided to go with egg-shell just to tone down the; - "Hi, we are the Grays and have abducted you to research how your liver can handle this much alcohol" look. I got concrete paint with a foundation mixed into it so that I didn't have to do a foundation layer. The challenge...

The Brew Barn - The Adventure Continues

This is part 2 in an on-going series, click [here] for part 1. After letting the room dry for a few days after the washing, I went to work using a scraper to get rid of any loose paint so that I wouldn't have a "paint comes off after 35 minutes" situation. I did get most of the loose paint using the power-washer though, so it was quick work. I also got a concrete spackling paste to fill up some of the smaller holes left by nails, bolts and such through the 60 years this building has been in use. It's too soon to tell how well it worked but it was easy to apply and I was able to paint over it within a few hours of putting it on. I was going to paint the room regular white, but after talking to a few people I decided to go with egg-shell just to tone down the; - "Hi, we are the Grays and have abducted you to research how your liver can handle this much alcohol" look. I got concrete paint with a foundation mixed into it so that I didn't have to do a foundation layer. The challenge...

The Brew Barn - One Man's Epic Brew Barn Build

As a long time beer drinker with a craft brew budget that would rival most, I've often considered taking up brewing as a hobby. I'd done a brew here and there with friends, but never really had my own setup and equipment... until now. After ordering all the brewing equipment I would need to set up: Speidel 20l (5 gal) Fermenting buckets. Hydrometer. Corny Kegs with a regulator and faucet. Auto-siphon. Bottle-capper. Bottle caps. I looked around my house and went "Where am I going to put all of this?" Luckily, I have a 3300 square foot, 3 story barn. Unfortunately, the ideal place to put my brewing room was the 1200 square foot room that has been used for storage since 93'. I would like to share a picture of what I looked like when I started, unfortunately, I didn't take one because I still have flashbacks to the mess. To give you an idea of the state of the room here is a picture of the part I'm doing as a winter project: [/hide]

The Brew Barn - One Man's Epic Brew Barn Build

As a long time beer drinker with a craft brew budget that would rival most, I've often considered taking up brewing as a hobby. I'd done a brew here and there with friends, but never really had my own setup and equipment... until now. After ordering all the brewing equipment I would need to set up: Speidel 20l (5 gal) Fermenting buckets. Hydrometer. Corny Kegs with a regulator and faucet. Auto-siphon. Bottle-capper. Bottle caps. I looked around my house and went "Where am I going to put all of this?" Luckily, I have a 3300 square foot, 3 story barn. Unfortunately, the ideal place to put my brewing room was the 1200 square foot room that has been used for storage since 93'. I would like to share a picture of what I looked like when I started, unfortunately, I didn't take one because I still have flashbacks to the mess. To give you an idea of the state of the room here is a picture of the part I'm doing as a winter project: [/hide]
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