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Noble Hops

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(New page: Category:Beer Category:Glossary Category:Ingredients Category:Hops {{hopHeader}} The term "noble" applies only to four traditional German hops: ...)
 
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[[Category:Hops]]
 
[[Category:Hops]]
 
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The term "noble" applies only to four traditional [[:Category:German Hops|German hops]]:  
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The term "noble" is used to describe [[hops]] that share a particular set of characteristics.  Unfortunately, nobody agrees on which characteristics these are, and therefore there is very little agreement on which hops qualify as "noble."
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It is generally agreed that to be noble, a hop must have a relatively low total [[alpha acid]] content (usually around 2-6 %), and a mild, pleasant aroma.  Other characteristics usually cited include:
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* low [[beta acids]]
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* [[alpha acid]] to [[beta acid]] levels close to 1:1
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* high [[humulene]] levels
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* low [[myrcene]] levels
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* poor storage characteristics
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Since the growing area affects the character of the hops, even varieties which are considered "noble" in one area generally are not thought to have noble character when grown elsewhere.
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Only two varieties of hop are universally considered to be noble:
  
* [[Hallertauer]] Mittelfrueh
 
 
* Tettnang [[Tettnanger]]
 
* Tettnang [[Tettnanger]]
* [[Spalt Spalter]]
 
 
* Czech [[Saaz]]
 
* Czech [[Saaz]]
  
All these hops have certain features in common such as low [[alpha acids|alpha acids]], poor storage life, very fine aromas and flavours. The term noble is being spread by the industry to cover newer varieties as well but this has often failed to catch on.
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And two additional varieties are often, but not always, included in the definition:
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* [[Hallertauer]] Mittelfrueh
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* [[Spalt Spalter]]
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However, depending on the brewer and the definition used, the following hops may also be considered noble:
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* U.S. [[Liberty]]
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* Hallertau [[Hallertauer]]
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* Tettnang [[Tettnanger]]
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* Hersbruck [[Hersbrucker]]
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* Spalt [[Spalter]]
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* East Kent [[Golding]]
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* U.K. [[Fuggle]]
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* Styrian [[Golding]]

Revision as of 08:03, 14 August 2007

This article discusses a specific variety of hops. For general information about selecting, using or propogating hops, see the main hop page The term "noble" is used to describe hops that share a particular set of characteristics. Unfortunately, nobody agrees on which characteristics these are, and therefore there is very little agreement on which hops qualify as "noble."

It is generally agreed that to be noble, a hop must have a relatively low total alpha acid content (usually around 2-6 %), and a mild, pleasant aroma. Other characteristics usually cited include:

Since the growing area affects the character of the hops, even varieties which are considered "noble" in one area generally are not thought to have noble character when grown elsewhere.

Only two varieties of hop are universally considered to be noble:

And two additional varieties are often, but not always, included in the definition:

However, depending on the brewer and the definition used, the following hops may also be considered noble: