Quantcast
Namespaces
Variants
Actions
Personal tools

Barley Wine

From HomeBrewTalk Wiki
(Difference between revisions)
Jump to: navigation, search
(History of Barley Wine)
m
 
(One intermediate revision by one user not shown)
Line 8: Line 8:
 
'''Barley Wine''' or '''Barleywine''' is a style of strong, sweet [[ale]] originating in England in the nineteenth century.
 
'''Barley Wine''' or '''Barleywine''' is a style of strong, sweet [[ale]] originating in England in the nineteenth century.
  
Barley wine is characterized by a high level of alcohol, often 10% [[abv]] or more, a similar level to [[wine]].  It often features strong flavors of sherry and dark fruit and a complex sweet malt character, with little or no hops.  Barley wine is often aged for a year or more, and is sometimes therefore labeled with a vintage, similar to [[wine]].  Barrel aging is common, as well as unusual flavors created during long fermentations.  Wine yeast is sometimes used to achieve higher alcohol content than is possible with traditional ale yeast.
+
Barley wine is characterized by a high level of alcohol, often 10% [[abv]] or more, a similar level to [[wine]].  It often features strong flavors of sherry and dark fruit and a complex sweet malt character, with little or no hops.  Barley wine is often aged for a year or more, and is sometimes therefore labeled with a vintage, similar to [[wine]].  [[Barrel aging]] is common, as well as unusual flavors created during long fermentations.  Wine yeast is sometimes used to achieve higher alcohol content than is possible with traditional ale [[yeast]].
  
 
==History of Barley Wine==
 
==History of Barley Wine==
Line 123: Line 123:
 
|color=8-15 (16-30 EBC)
 
|color=8-15 (16-30 EBC)
 
}}
 
}}
 +
 +
==External Links==
 +
* [http://www.allaboutbeer.com/homebrew/23.4-octoberbeer.html Dragon's Milk: English October Beer] - All About Beer Magazine

Latest revision as of 20:38, 16 November 2008


Barley Wine or Barleywine is a style of strong, sweet ale originating in England in the nineteenth century.

Barley wine is characterized by a high level of alcohol, often 10% abv or more, a similar level to wine. It often features strong flavors of sherry and dark fruit and a complex sweet malt character, with little or no hops. Barley wine is often aged for a year or more, and is sometimes therefore labeled with a vintage, similar to wine. Barrel aging is common, as well as unusual flavors created during long fermentations. Wine yeast is sometimes used to achieve higher alcohol content than is possible with traditional ale yeast.

Contents

History of Barley Wine

The term Barley Wine was coined by Bass in 1903 to describe its Bass No. 1 Ale. CAMRA claims that its origins were patriotic, since the English upper classes needed a beverage to replace French wine during England's many wars with France.

Prior to 1903, strong English ales were commonly called October Beer, March Beer or Harvest Beer.

Types of Barley Wine

English Barley Wine

Traditional English Barley Wine is essentially a very strong bitter, brewed with very high amounts of pale malt. Hop character is generally absent and bitterness is often low compared to the high gravity, giving the beer a complex, sweet malt character, often with hints of treacle or toffee and a pleasant sherry-like flavor after a few years' aging.

Commercial examples include Whitbread’s Gold Label (10.9%), Bass’s No 1 Barley Wine (10.5%), and Fuller’s Vintage Ale (8.5%), a bottle-conditioned version of its Golden Pride brewed with different varieties of malts and hops every year. Some American brewers also brew English-style barley wines; one example is Anchor's Old Foghorn.

American Barley Wine

American Barley Wine tends to be hoppier and more bitter than English varieties, with the hops, sometimes distinctly American hops, playing a more significant role. There is often more yeast character as well, with some fruity esters moderating the pure sweetness of the English style, and gravities are often even higher than English barley wines.

Wheat Wine

A relatively recent American development, Wheat Wine is a barley wine made with a high proportion, usually 50% or more, wheat malt. Similar to American barley wine, but with a grainy, bready flavor and a distinctive fluffy mouthfeel.

Imperial Barley Wine

More of a stunt than a style, the best-known example of this style is Samuel Adams' Utopias, a barley wine style beer brewed even stronger than usual; in this case, 25% abv.

Brewing Barley Wine

This section is a stub.
Help make this wiki better and contribute some content.

Competition Styles

Both the BJCP and the GABF style guidelines recognize both English and American barley wine as separate styles for competition purposes. The GABF also recognize wheat wine as a separate style.

BJCP Style Guidelines

English Barleywine

19B. English Barleywine Vital Statistics
BJCP Style Guideline Definition (2004)
IBUs: 35-70 SRM: 8-22 OG: 1.080-1.120+ FG: 1.018-1.030+ ABV: 8-12+
Aroma: Very rich and strongly malty, often with a caramel-like aroma. May have moderate to strong fruitiness, often with a dried-fruit character. English hop aroma may range from mild to assertive. Alcohol aromatics may be low to moderate. The intensity of these aromatics often subsides with age. The aroma may have a rich character including bready, toasty, toffee, molasses, and/or treacle notes. Aged versions may have a sherry-like quality, possibly vinous or port-like aromatics, and generally more muted malt aromas. Low to no diacetyl.
Appearance: Color may range from rich gold to very dark amber or even dark brown. Often has ruby highlights, but should not be opaque. Low to moderate off-white head; may have low head retention. May be cloudy with chill haze at cooler temperatures, but generally clears to good to brilliant clarity as it warms. The color may appear to have great depth, as if viewed through a thick glass lens. High alcohol and viscosity may be visible in "legs" when beer is swirled in a glass.
Flavor: Very rich and strongly malty, often with a caramel-like aroma. May have moderate to strong fruitiness, often with a dried-fruit character. English hop aroma may range from mild to assertive. Alcohol aromatics may be low to moderate. The intensity of these aromatics often subsides with age. The aroma may have a rich character including bready, toasty, toffee, molasses, and/or treacle notes. Aged versions may have a sherry-like quality, possibly vinous or port-like aromatics, and generally more muted malt aromas. Low to no diacetyl.
Mouthfeel: Full-bodied and chewy, with a velvety, luscious texture (although the body may decline with long conditioning). A smooth warmth from aged alcohol should be present. Carbonation may be low to moderate, depending on age and conditioning.
Overall Impression: Very rich and strongly malty, often with a caramel-like aroma. May have moderate to strong fruitiness, often with a dried-fruit character. English hop aroma may range from mild to assertive. Alcohol aromatics may be low to moderate. The intensity of these aromatics often subsides with age. The aroma may have a rich character including bready, toasty, toffee, molasses, and/or treacle notes. Aged versions may have a sherry-like quality, possibly vinous or port-like aromatics, and generally more muted malt aromas. Low to no diacetyl.
History: Usually the strongest ale offered by a brewery, and in recent years many commercial examples are now vintage-dated. Normally aged significantly prior to release. Often associated with the winter or holiday season.
Comments: Although often a hoppy beer, the English Barleywine places less emphasis on hop character than the American Barleywine and features English hops. English versions can be darker, maltier, fruitier, and feature richer specialty malt flavors than American Barleywines.
Ingredients: Well-modified pale malt should form the backbone of the grist, with judicious amounts of caramel malts. Dark malts should be used with great restraint, if at all, as most of the color arises from a lengthy boil. English hops such as Northdown, Target, East Kent Goldings and Fuggles. Characterful English yeast.
Commercial Examples: Thomas Hardy's Ale, Burton Bridge Thomas Sykes Old Ale, Robinson's Old Tom, J.W. Lee's Vintage Harvest Ale, Fuller's Golden Pride, Young's Old Nick (unusual in its 7.2% ABV), Whitbread Gold Label, Lakefront Beer Line, Heavyweight Old Salty


American Barleywine

19C. American Barleywine Vital Statistics
BJCP Style Guideline Definition (2004)
IBUs: 50-120 SRM: 10-19 OG: 1.080-1.120+ FG: 1.016-1.030+ ABV: 8-12+
Aroma: Very rich and intense maltiness. Hop character moderate to assertive and often showcases citrusy or resiny American varieties (although other varieties, such as floral, earthy or spicy English varieties or a blend of varieties, may be used). Low to moderately strong fruity esters and alcohol aromatics. Malt character may be sweet, caramelly, bready, or fairly neutral. However, the intensity of aromatics often subsides with age. No diacetyl.
Appearance: Color may range from light amber to medium copper; may rarely be as dark as light brown. Often has ruby highlights. Moderately-low to large off-white to light tan head; may have low head retention. May be cloudy with chill haze at cooler temperatures, but generally clears to good to brilliant clarity as it warms. The color may appear to have great depth, as if viewed through a thick glass lens. High alcohol and viscosity may be visible in "legs" when beer is swirled in a glass.
Flavor: Very rich and intense maltiness. Hop character moderate to assertive and often showcases citrusy or resiny American varieties (although other varieties, such as floral, earthy or spicy English varieties or a blend of varieties, may be used). Low to moderately strong fruity esters and alcohol aromatics. Malt character may be sweet, caramelly, bready, or fairly neutral. However, the intensity of aromatics often subsides with age. No diacetyl.
Mouthfeel: Full-bodied and chewy, with a velvety, luscious texture (although the body may decline with long conditioning). Alcohol warmth should be present, but not be excessively hot. Should not be syrupy and under-attenuated. Carbonation may be low to moderate, depending on age and conditioning.
Overall Impression: Very rich and intense maltiness. Hop character moderate to assertive and often showcases citrusy or resiny American varieties (although other varieties, such as floral, earthy or spicy English varieties or a blend of varieties, may be used). Low to moderately strong fruity esters and alcohol aromatics. Malt character may be sweet, caramelly, bready, or fairly neutral. However, the intensity of aromatics often subsides with age. No diacetyl.
History: Usually the strongest ale offered by a brewery, and in recent years many commercial examples are now vintage-dated. Normally aged significantly prior to release. Often associated with the winter or holiday season.
Comments: The American version of the Barleywine tends to have a greater emphasis on hop bitterness, flavor and aroma than the English Barleywine, and often features American hop varieties. Differs from an Imperial IPA in that the hops are not extreme, the malt is more forward, and the body is richer and more characterful.
Ingredients: Well-modified pale malt should form the backbone of the grist. Some specialty or character malts may be used. Dark malts should be used with great restraint, if at all, as most of the color arises from a lengthy boil. Citrusy American hops are common, although any varieties can be used in quantity. Generally uses an attenuative American yeast.
Commercial Examples: Sierra Nevada Bigfoot, Rogue Old Crustacean, Anchor Old Foghorn, Victory Old Horizontal, Brooklyn Monster Ale, Avery Hog Heaven Barleywine, Bell's Third Coast Old Ale, Weyerbacher Blithering Idiot, Three Floyds Behemoth, Old Dominion Millennium, Stone Old Guardian, Bridgeport Old Knucklehead, Hair of the Dog Doggie Claws, Left Hand Widdershins


GABF Style Listings

English-Style Barley Wine Ale

75A. English-Style Barley Wine Ale
GABF Style Listing (2007)
English style barley wines range from tawny copper to dark brown in color and have a full body and high residual malty sweetness. Complexity of alcohols and fruity-ester characters are often high and counterbalanced by the perception of low to medium bitterness and extraordinary alcohol content. Hop aroma and flavor may be minimal to medium. English type hops are often used but not necessary for this style. Low levels of diacetyl may be acceptable. Caramel and some characters indicating oxidation, such as vinous (sometimes sherry-like) aromas and/or flavors, may be considered positive. Chill haze is allowable at cold temperatures.
Original Gravity (ºPlato): 1.085-1.120 (21.5-28 ºPlato)
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (ºPlato): 1.024-1.032 (6-8 ºPlato)
Alcohol by Weight (Volume): 6.7-9.6% (8.4-12%)
Bitterness (IBU): 40-60
Color SRM (EBC): 14-22 (28-44 EBC)


American-Style Barley Wine Ale

75B. American-Style Barley Wine Ale
GABF Style Listing (2007)
American style barley wines range from amber to deep copper-garnet in color and have a full body and high residual malty sweetness. Complexity of alcohols and fruity-ester characters are often high and counterbalanced by assertive bitterness and extraordinary alcohol content. Hop aroma and flavor are at medium to very high levels. American type hops are often used but not necessary for this style. Very low levels of diacetyl may be acceptable. A caramel and/or toffee aroma and flavor are often part of the character. Chill haze is allowable at cold temperatures.
Original Gravity (ºPlato): 1.090-1.120 (21.5-28 ºPlato)
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (ºPlato): 1.024-1.032 (6-8 ºPlato)
Alcohol by Weight (Volume): 6.7-9.6% (8.4-12%)
Bitterness (IBU): 60-100
Color SRM (EBC): 11-18 (22-36 EBC)


American-Style Wheat Wine Ale

74. American-Style Wheat Wine Ale
GABF Style Listing (2007)
American style wheat wines range from gold to deep amber and are brewed with 50% or more wheat malt. They have full body and high residual malty sweetness. Bitterness is moderate to low. Fruity-ester characters are often high and counterbalanced by complexity of alcohols and high alcohol content. Hop aroma and flavor are at low to medium levels. Very low levels of diacetyl may be acceptable. Bready, wheat and/or caramel aroma and flavor are often part of the character. Phenolic yeast character, sulfur, and/or sweet corn-like dimethylsulfide (DMS) should not be present. Chill haze is allowable.
Original Gravity (ºPlato): 1.088-1.120 (21-28 ºPlato)
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (ºPlato): 1.024-1.032 (6-8 ºPlato)
Alcohol by Weight (Volume): 6.7-9.6% (8.4-12%)
Bitterness (IBU): 50-85
Color SRM (EBC): 8-15 (16-30 EBC)

External Links