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Scottish Light Ale

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The lightest of the traditional Scottish beer styles, Scottish Light Ale or 60 Shilling (sometimes abbreviated 60/-) is a light, malty session beer, with a strong malt character from a traditional boil and little hop character.

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[edit] Brewing Scottish Light Ale

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[edit] Competition Styles

Both the BJCP and the GABF recognize Scottish Light Ale.

[edit] BJCP Style Guidelines

[edit] Scottish Light 60/-

9A. Scottish Light 60/- Vital Statistics
BJCP Style Guideline Definition (2004)
IBUs: 10-20 SRM: 9-17 OG: 1.030-1.035 FG: 1.010-1.013 ABV: 2.5-3.2
Aroma: Low to medium malty sweetness, sometimes accentuated by low to moderate kettle caramelization. Some examples have a low hop aroma, light fruitiness, low diacetyl, and/or a low to moderate peaty aroma (all are optional). The peaty aroma is sometimes perceived as earthy, smoky or very lightly roasted.
Appearance: Deep amber to dark copper. Usually very clear due to long, cool fermentations. Low to moderate, creamy off-white to light tan-colored head.
Flavor: Low to medium malty sweetness, sometimes accentuated by low to moderate kettle caramelization. Some examples have a low hop aroma, light fruitiness, low diacetyl, and/or a low to moderate peaty aroma (all are optional). The peaty aroma is sometimes perceived as earthy, smoky or very lightly roasted.
Mouthfeel: Medium-low to medium body. Low to moderate carbonation. Sometimes a bit creamy, but often quite dry due to use of roasted barley.
Overall Impression: Low to medium malty sweetness, sometimes accentuated by low to moderate kettle caramelization. Some examples have a low hop aroma, light fruitiness, low diacetyl, and/or a low to moderate peaty aroma (all are optional). The peaty aroma is sometimes perceived as earthy, smoky or very lightly roasted.
History: Traditional Scottish session beers reflecting the indigenous ingredients (water, malt), with less hops than their English counterparts (due to the need to import them). Long, cool fermentations are traditionally used in Scottish brewing.
Comments: The malt-hop balance is slightly to moderately tilted towards the malt side. Any caramelization comes from kettle caramelization and not caramel malt (and is sometimes confused with diacetyl). Although unusual, any smoked character is yeast- or water-derived and not from the use of peat-smoked malts. Use of peat-smoked malt to replicate the peaty character should be restrained; overly smoky beers should be entered in the Smoked Beer category rather than here.
Ingredients: Scottish or English pale base malt. Small amounts of roasted barley add color and flavor, and lend a dry, slightly roasty finish. English hops. Clean, relatively un-attenuative ale yeast. Some commercial brewers add small amounts of crystal, amber, or wheat malts, and adjuncts such as sugar. The optional peaty, earthy and/or smoky character comes from the traditional yeast and from the local malt and water rather than using smoked malts.
Commercial Examples: Belhaven 60/-, McEwan's 60/-, Maclay 60/- Light (all are cask-only products not exported to the US)

[edit] GABF Style Listings

[edit] Scottish Style Light Ale

50A. Scottish Style Light Ale
GABF Style Listing (2007)
Scottish light ales are light bodied. Little bitterness is perceived and hop flavor or aroma should not be perceived. Despite its lightness, Scottish light ale will have a degree of malty, caramel like, soft and chewy character. Yeast characters such as diacetyl (butterscotch) and sulfuriness are acceptable at very low levels. The color will range from golden amber to deep brown. Bottled versions of this traditional draft beer may contain higher amounts of carbon dioxide than is typical for mildly carbonated draft versions. Chill haze is acceptable at low temperatures. Though there is little evidence suggesting that traditionally made Scottish-style light ales exhibited peat smoke character, the current marketplace offers Scottish-style light ales with peat or smoke character present at low to medium levels. Thus for the purpose of this competition a peaty/smoky character may be evident at low levels (ales with medium or higher smoke character would be considered a smoke flavored beer and considered in another category).
Original Gravity (ºPlato): 1.030-1.035 (7.5-9 ºPlato)
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (ºPlato): 1.006-1.012 (1.5-3 ºPlato)
Alcohol by Weight (Volume): 2.2-2.8% (2.8-3.5%)
Bitterness (IBU): 9-20
Color SRM (EBC): 8-17 (16-34 EBC)