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Old 01-26-2009, 04:37 AM   #1
Paraops
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Default First brew ever, a 10gal all grain.

Hi guys, I'm new here... and new to brewing....an old hat at drinking however

I converted two kegs to a HLT and a boil kettle, converted a 60qt Ice Cube to an MLT with copper manifold and fabricated an immersion chiller. The system appearently worked the way it was supposed to. I brewed a 10gal batch of a Boulevard Wheat clone yesterday. My OG was really close to target, coming in at 1.048. I split the batch between two 5gal carboys, pitched one smack pack of Wyeast 1050 between the two and had visible evidence of aggressive fermintation within a matter of hrs.

My plan is to keg everything once it's time.

One question i do have is about secondary fermintation as opposed to leaving the wort in primary. What is the advantage to transferring to secondary and can I get the same results leaving the batch in primary?

Thanks for your input!


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Old 01-26-2009, 04:58 AM   #2
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racking to a secondary is a good way to get nice clear, finished tasting beer.

Quick question...... How did you go from not brewing to a ten gallon all grain setup? I assumed that many people (like me) started with an $90 kit and worked their way up from there.


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Old 01-26-2009, 05:05 AM   #3
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i would say leave the beer in the primary for 3-4 weeks. i used to rush out of the primary but i definitely get better results leaving it on the yeast longer-allows them to clean up after themselves a little better. it also gives time to form a nice hard yeast cake that is even easier to rack off of. i would personally go 3-4 in primary, 1 in secondary (to let any remaining/transferred sediment to settle) then bottle (keg in your situation). thats my 2 cents, there are much more experienced members on here.
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Old 01-26-2009, 05:09 AM   #4
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Dude, hell of a start! Sounds like you've got a nice setup, especially great for a first time brewer. I do not secondary any of my beers unless I plan to store them for over 8 weeks, or I want to dry hop them. Some people use a secondary to get clear beer, but I have clear beer by just using an exended primary (about 6 weeks), and about 3 weeks in the keg. The first couple pints are a bit cloudy, but after that it's all clear beer!

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Old 01-27-2009, 01:44 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by silvervan83 View Post
racking to a secondary is a good way to get nice clear, finished tasting beer.

Quick question...... How did you go from not brewing to a ten gallon all grain setup? I assumed that many people (like me) started with an $90 kit and worked their way up from there.
I simply decided to start there. I knew I wanted to do all grain once I heard what it entailed. I fabricated what I needed to, bought what I couldn't build. I did my homework on the whole process with an emphysis on the mash. I ordered the ingredients and followed the recipe.

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Old 01-27-2009, 01:50 AM   #6
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Is it me or was there a couple posts on this thread that were deleted? Mods? Anyone?
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Old 01-27-2009, 02:03 AM   #7
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mine was deleted earlier today, but it's back now...weird.
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Old 01-27-2009, 02:06 AM   #8
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oh, i see what you did there....and it's called a double post! My posts didn't get deleted...they're right here!
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Old 01-27-2009, 02:30 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Paraops View Post
I split the batch between two 5gal carboys, pitched one smack pack of Wyeast 1050 between the two and had visible evidence of aggressive fermintation within a matter of hrs.
I know that you said you had an aggressive fermentation within hours with this approach, but next time I would recommend using at least two packs/vials of yeast (1 per batch) or better yet, making a big starter (1-2L per batch) of a single strain and splitting that between the two. In the end, you'll be better off getting consistent results.

It involves a bit of planning ahead, as opposed to going to the brew shop, purchasing, and then brewing, but one of the reasons I wanted to start brewing 10 gallons was to test out some of my favorite recipes with different strains and do side by side comparisons.

I also don't often use a secondary. The only time I'll do it is to dry-hop and IPA, and I usually let that sit in the primary for a good 4 weeks or so.

Congrats on a huge first batch, that's impressive.
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Old 01-27-2009, 02:35 AM   #10
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Thanks a lot Heinz.

Two Heads..... LOL I just realized the same thing (Double post) I'm a dumb a$$

Maybe one of the Mods can consolidate the two threads. Sorry guys!


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