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Old 06-01-2006, 04:12 AM   #1
RichBrewer
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I'm just about ready to give up home brewing and try knitting!
My kegging system is driving me nuts! I've got 2 brews under the same pressure. My ESB and Honey ale. to get the ESB out, I drop the pressure to 5 PSI and I get a nice stream of beer. When I try to pour the Honey ale all I get is foam. I've tried everything including switching the beer hoses from keg to keg. If I go with 5PSI I can see the foam gathering in the tubing. If I go any higher the beer shoots out in a stream of foam.
If I can't figure this out I'm going to have to dump the whole thing out.

What on earth is causing this?
RDWHAHB isn't helping right now!
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Old 06-01-2006, 04:15 AM   #2
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I'd bet it is overcarbed. How it got that way with both of the beers under the same pressur eis kind of a mystery, but I guarantee it is overcarbed. Vent it for a day and start over.
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Old 06-01-2006, 04:22 AM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dude
I'd bet it is overcarbed. How it got that way with both of the beers under the same pressur eis kind of a mystery, but I guarantee it is overcarbed. Vent it for a day and start over.
I will give it a try.
Do you think 2 beers with different gravities can carbonate at different levels under the same pressure? Or could it be that some beers are more susceptible to foaming?
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Old 06-01-2006, 04:27 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RichBrewer
I will give it a try.
Do you think 2 beers with different gravities can carbonate at different levels under the same pressure? Or could it be that some beers are more susceptible to foaming?
I don't recall that being a problem--the only thing I know that could happen is if the temp of the kegs is different, one could absorb CO2 faster, but that shouldn't happen in the same fridge.

How do you have the gas lines hooked up? Do you have valves from each hose so you can regulate how much CO2 goes to each, or are they both always the same exact pressure?

Without seeing your system, another possibility could be the beer lines are too short? Are they the same length on both kegs?
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Old 06-01-2006, 04:47 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dude
I don't recall that being a problem--the only thing I know that could happen is if the temp of the kegs is different, one could absorb CO2 faster, but that shouldn't happen in the same fridge.

How do you have the gas lines hooked up? Do you have valves from each hose so you can regulate how much CO2 goes to each, or are they both always the same exact pressure?

Without seeing your system, another possibility could be the beer lines are too short? Are they the same length on both kegs?
I have a T in the gas line so both should be at the same pressure. The beer lines are about 7 feet long and I've tried both lines on the honey ale with the same result.
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Old 06-01-2006, 04:52 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RichBrewer
I have a T in the gas line so both should be at the same pressure. The beer lines are about 7 feet long and I've tried both lines on the honey ale with the same result.
Don't know HOW it got overcarbed then, but that's my bet.
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Old 06-01-2006, 05:48 AM   #7
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what you can do to help remedy is get a longer beer line, it will help to drop the pressure. start longer, then cut back as necessary. pretty cheap solution too, just takes a bit of time.

 
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Old 06-01-2006, 01:20 PM   #8
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I have a 4 tap kegerator with everything identical between the co2 manifold and the tower... and for some reason I have some beers that foam a lot more than others... I think it may just have something to do with the type of beer...

 
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Old 06-01-2006, 01:51 PM   #9
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One of the factors in foaming is the number of nucleation sites in the beer. I bet if you filtered the Honey ale, you'd see far less foaming. There might also be something wrong with the outlet plug and poppet. If the poppet is restricting the flow too much, it will cause foaming. Does the foam start immediately and at the keg?
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Old 06-01-2006, 05:41 PM   #10
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I had this problem with one of mine not too long ago and it turned out that the valve for the beer line had some "stuff" in it and it wasn't fully opening/closing quickly enough and foaming the beer in the line.

I'd recommend breaking down the keg, once emptied of course, and clean it out real good. I ended up dropping my psi (yes I have two regulators) to that keg to alomst 0. Just enough to get the beer out. It still foamed, but not as bad. I just used a pitcher and let it sit for a few minutes before drinking.

 
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