Making a Dry Stout, need rice hulls??? - Home Brew Forums
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Old 01-09-2009, 05:17 PM   #1
Matt Up North
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I am going with no, but after my little Rye debacle I am wondering if a handful every batch wouldn't hurt.

Matt's Dry American Stout (Should be Irish, but every ingredient is American so...)

10gal batch

15lbs American 2-Row
2lbs Chocolate
.5lbs Crystal 90
.5lbs Crystal 60
5oz Black Patent

2 oz Fuggles (60min)
2 oz Mt. Hood (30 min) (I don't have anything else, though could run to the store later today for the brewday tomorrow)
Nottingham Yeast

I am confident that this will turn out tasting like beer, but I have to admit that it is a little low in OG and I might make that run to the LHBS to get another 5lbs of 2-Row and some more hops. I really am looking for about 40+ IBU's and right now it is sitting at just over 30. My Orfy's Mild Brown which I love has about 25 and after a month it lacks a little bit of bittering, and I want this stout to still have that after a month. Maybe I will go with all Fuggles and really work them at 3oz for 60min and 1 oz for 45min to get just shy of 40IBU.

Thoughts? Suggestions?
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Old 01-09-2009, 05:26 PM   #2
Bjornbrewer
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you don't need rice hulls as there is nothing that will get you a stuck mash. If you were adding large amounts of oats or flaked wheat, then yes, but you should be good.

 
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Old 01-09-2009, 06:10 PM   #3
Shawn Hargreaves
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Looks tasty, but with all that chocolate it seems more like a porter than a stout to me! You really need some roasted barley to make it a stout.

 
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Old 01-09-2009, 06:36 PM   #4
Cugel
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Mar 2008
Washington D.C. Metro area
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The classic recipe would be

7 lbs maris otter
2 lbs flaked barley
1 lb roast barley

Add in a yeast like Wyeast 1084 (Irish Ale), 1056 or 1028 - the latter just worked REALLY well for me in a Dry Stout. very Guinness-like.

All the best!
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Old 01-09-2009, 06:41 PM   #5
brewt00l
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Rice hulls not required.

I too am a fan of the classic, simple-straight forward dry stout recipes with WLP007 as my go-to yeast.

 
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Old 01-09-2009, 07:38 PM   #6
Matt Up North
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Shawn Hargreaves View Post
Looks tasty, but with all that chocolate it seems more like a porter than a stout to me! You really need some roasted barley to make it a stout.
We will call it Matt's Chocolate American Stout then . I chose to go with the Black Patent over the Roasted for the reason that I wanted that flavor instead. I could up it though by all means to 9oz instead of the 5oz. Below is the style comparison I got with the recipe recalculated to 9oz.

Style Comparison
Low Mine High
OG 1.035 1.042 1.050
FG 1.007 1.011 1.011
IBU 30 39 50
SRM 34 35+
ABV 3.2 4.0 5.5

I reran it with 20lbs two row and it came out at 1.054 instead which is out of style so I am sticking with my 15lbs.

Quote:
brewt00l Rice hulls not required.

I too am a fan of the classic, simple-straight forward dry stout recipes with WLP007 as my go-to yeast.
I haven't used that, though have used Nottingham plenty. Maybe the next one in a five gallon so that I can get an idea of what it tastes like in comparison.
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Old 01-09-2009, 08:12 PM   #7
Bjornbrewer
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"Style" is about more than fitting into a number range...it's also process and ingredients used.

However, homebrewing is also about more than making a "style".

Do what you want and if you like it...make it again! looks tasty to me.

 
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Old 01-09-2009, 10:02 PM   #8
Matt Up North
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bjornbrewer View Post
"Style" is about more than fitting into a number range...it's also process and ingredients used.

However, homebrewing is also about more than making a "style".

Do what you want and if you like it...make it again! looks tasty to me.
I agree with you about style totally! We make our own style around this forum

I am seeing two different roasted barleys 300L and 500L. Which do you use?
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Old 01-09-2009, 11:38 PM   #9
Bob
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I dunno what the 300L stuff is, but it doesn't sound like classic Roasted Barley.

Style is only important if you're going to call something by a style name. I'm a stickler for style only in that circumstance. Because style isn't about you the brewer; it's about the drinker. You hand me this beer and call it a dry stout, I'm going to expect a Guinness or Murphy's dry Irish stout. Your recipe, however, is going to deliver something quite different. So by calling it a Dry Stout, you've confused me, and that impacts my appreciation of your work.

My rule is simple - if you're going waaaay outside the style guidelines, call it something else. Call it Matt's Mighty Black Beer or something, but don't go telling people it's Dry Stout when it has none of the hallmark characteristics I can detect with my palate. I can't tell the OG, the FG, from tasting it. I can approximate the IBU and SRM with my organic sensors, but the rest comes from what you put in it for me to taste, smell and feel. No roasted barley + flavor hops - flaked barley = wrong flavor and mouthfeel for Dry Stout. Simple as that!

All that said, I think your recipe sounds yummy, and you both are right about style being something we define ourselves. That happens over time. Maybe someday you'll see Brown Chocolate Stout. But in the meantime, you're just going to have to deal with Style Nazis like me!

Bob
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Old 01-10-2009, 02:31 AM   #10
Matt Up North
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Well, yesterday I was unaware of what the BJCP Style Guidlines said were a Dry stout and after researching it appears that I am not making a dry stout.

I make wine and dry means less sweet. If I make a beer that is less sweet it doesn't make it a Dry Stout

It does seem though that I was making more of an American Stout with low alcohol. The reworked recipe is this:

Matt's Short and Stout

15lbs American 2-ROw
1lb Chocolate
1lb Roasted Barley
8oz 90L
6oz Black Patent

3oz Fuggles (60min)
1oz Fuggles (45min)
Irish Moss (15min)
Nottingham Yeast

Suggestions again?
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