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Old 01-07-2009, 05:54 PM   #51
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lamarguy View Post
So, I'll revise my statement to say "the starch conversion process is slow enough at room temperature to be impractical for brewing". Better?
That works......although.....if one steeped for 24 hours, I'm pretty sure there would be some conversion. I've been tempted to do an experimental brew with a mash at room temp (time still undecided) followed by what I'll call a full decocotion (boil the whole dang thing, grains and all) with hop additions, and then chill and to the carboy. Sort of like a Berliner-weisse. I'll just have to watch the souring during the mash. I might add some K-sorbate and metabisulfite (as per wine makers) to slow the lactobacillus down. Oh yeah, it would only be a 2 gal batch lest it go terribly wrong

I actually find it quite remarkable that these enzymes work at all at mashing temps. Most enzymes in animals are not very happy at all at temperatures over 110F or under 90F. They're total wusses. Now with plants, their enzymes will work from under 32F to up to 170F. That's just cool, and is part why I chose to become a plant scientist, not an animal scientist, plus I often get to eat my leftover scientific subjects!
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Old 01-07-2009, 07:12 PM   #52
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so uh... what's the bottom line. man, i was hoping for some payoff after 6 pages.

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Old 01-07-2009, 07:14 PM   #53
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you'll just have to try it for yourself!
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Old 01-07-2009, 07:22 PM   #54
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Dude, this whole thread is like a big shaggy dog story. I kept going for 6 pages to see who was right (what the punchline is) only to get a "well, you'll have to try it" which is the equilivent to a super lame punchline after a 30 min story-joke.
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Old 01-07-2009, 07:28 PM   #55
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Originally Posted by Freezeblade View Post
Dude, this whole thread is like a big shaddy dog story.
Nice. I like dogs and I like stories...

Will cold steeping roasted grain hurt anything? Probably not, other than extract efficiency. Will it help avoid acrid roasted flavors from creeping into your brew? Maybe, maybe not. You decide!
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Old 01-08-2009, 02:49 PM   #56
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tagz View Post
so uh... what's the bottom line. man, i was hoping for some payoff after 6 pages.
What kind of payoff are you looking for? Try it and see. Brew two stouts side-by-side. One where you mash the dark grains and one where you cold-steep the grains and see which you like best.

Personally, for my oatmeal stouts, I prefer to cold-steep my dark grains. The flavor is much smoother and it makes a better beer, which what we're all after.

 
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Old 01-08-2009, 04:43 PM   #57
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be sure to post your results. we'll never figure this out if you don't
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Old 01-07-2010, 06:00 PM   #58
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Is there any merit to using the cold steeped infusion as an initial strike water in the mash? Another words, would the astringincy still appear by heating the infused water, or is the astringincy from heating the grains? I am curious because you might get good flavor results by converting what is extracted in the cold steep. I am wondering if the cold steep extracts anything that needs (could benifit from) conversion.

And I am also resurecting this thread

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Old 12-10-2012, 02:38 AM   #59
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DeathBrewer View Post
be sure to post your results. we'll never figure this out if you don't
For anyone doing research: I cold steeped 8 oz of Carafa Special III in 2 L of water over 24 hours in the fridge. The fridge cold liquid had a gravity of 1.030, which is not surprising as roasted grains don't need enzymatic activity to extract sugars as the roasting has made them accessible to be water soluble. The liquid had a slight roasty taste to it, but not much. I boiled it and added it to a Schwarzbier.

 
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Old 08-09-2015, 11:40 PM   #60
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I'm sure there have been a TON of experiments on this subject since the last post. I am very excited to see what the experts say now.

In addition, is it worthwhile to cold steep some (say 75%) of your roasted grain bill and then use the remaining 25% in the mash to get a more complex taste in your beer?

 
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