Trying to get more "body" in my beers... Techniques? - Home Brew Forums
Register Now For Free!

Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing > Trying to get more "body" in my beers... Techniques?

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 12-30-2008, 03:41 PM   #1
Anthony_Lopez
 
Anthony_Lopez's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Mar 2008
Groton, MA
Posts: 1,536
Liked 24 Times on 10 Posts



I have done a ton of reading, searching, etc, however I'm not really finding a direct answer to my question.

As an example, my IPA came out a little "thinner" than I'd like.

The grain bill (5 gallons) was:

12 lbs Pale 2 Row
1 lb Carapils
1 lb Crystal 60

Mashed at 153*F for ~60 minutes.

I did not lose any temp and hit my efficiency right around 75%.

Any help would be appreciated. I thought between the Crystal and the Carapils, I would get some decent body and head retention. The head retention is definitely there, however the body is not where I'd like it to be.

Thanks!
__________________
I'd rather have a bottle in front of me, than a frontal lobotomy.
--Tom Waits

You can't be a real country unless you have a beer and an airline - it helps if you have some kind of a football team, or some nuclear weapons, but at the very least you need a beer.
--Frank Zappa

My Cheap and Easy Stirplate

 
Reply With Quote
Old 12-30-2008, 03:48 PM   #2
Bobby_M
Vendor and Brewer
HBT_SPONSOR.png
 
Bobby_M's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Aug 2006
Whitehouse Station, NJ
Posts: 23,335
Liked 1765 Times on 1122 Posts


It's definitely a delicate balance. You can go 155F on the mash temp, but you also have to edge up your IBUs to take care of the residual sweetness you'll be left with.
__________________
Welcome to BrewHardware.com. I love you.
New Stirplates are IN!
Chugger Pumps, Pump Kits, Camlocks, Sightglasses, Clear USA made Silicone Tubing, RIMS, Electric Install Parts, etc.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 12-30-2008, 03:51 PM   #3
Anthony_Lopez
 
Anthony_Lopez's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Mar 2008
Groton, MA
Posts: 1,536
Liked 24 Times on 10 Posts


Is raising the mash temp going to effect my beer's body that much?
__________________
I'd rather have a bottle in front of me, than a frontal lobotomy.
--Tom Waits

You can't be a real country unless you have a beer and an airline - it helps if you have some kind of a football team, or some nuclear weapons, but at the very least you need a beer.
--Frank Zappa

My Cheap and Easy Stirplate

 
Reply With Quote
Old 12-30-2008, 04:12 PM   #4

Quote:
Originally Posted by Anthony_Lopez View Post
Is raising the mash temp going to effect my beer's body that much?
Yes, it can be considerable. Higher mash temps favor long chain dextrins, which give much of the weighty 'chewiness' in, say, an RIS or similar. Mashing higher is especially useful when making low ABV session ales that can be seem thin. When I last made my dark mild (3.8% ABV), I mashed at 158 for 45 to give that 'chew' factor.

But, as Bobby pointed out, it is a rather fine line to walk to keep the beer balanced. Another consideration is your yeast strain- what did you use with the IPA?


 
Reply With Quote
Old 12-30-2008, 04:18 PM   #5
Yooper
Ale's What Cures You!
HBT_ADMIN.png
 
Yooper's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Jun 2006
UP of Michigan, Winter Texan
Posts: 69,762
Liked 8028 Times on 5608 Posts


I mash almost all of my single infusion mashes at 1.25 quarts per pound and for an hour. I've read that a thicker mash and less time would give a tendency toward heavier bodied less fermentable worts also. I think that would be a lesser consideration than mash temp, but it might be worth a try.

As the others said, though, it might be a delicate balance because you don't want to end up with an underattenuated beer. I mash almost all of my APAs and IPAs in the 154 range, as I like them medium bodied.
__________________
Broken Leg Brewery
Giving beer a leg to stand on since 2006

 
Reply With Quote
Old 12-30-2008, 04:19 PM   #6
lamarguy
 
lamarguy's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Aug 2008
Austin, TX
Posts: 1,653
Liked 26 Times on 25 Posts


You have a couple of options to increase body/mouthfeel:
  1. Add maltodextrin powder. This is the simplest solution.
  2. Add long-chain unfermentables (e.g., caramel malt, unmalted wheat, or oats). A protein rest at 122F is advantageous if using unmalted wheat/oats.
  3. Mash at a higher temperature (e.g., 156F). Results in a sweeter beer too.


 
Reply With Quote
Old 12-30-2008, 04:59 PM   #7
Anthony_Lopez
 
Anthony_Lopez's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Mar 2008
Groton, MA
Posts: 1,536
Liked 24 Times on 10 Posts


As stated, the mash was 153*F. Perhaps I'll try a slightly higher mash (154-155) and step up my hop bill to balance out the IPA. I use 1056 yeast exclusively for my IPAs and APAs. In the case of one of my IPAs that had a slow yeast starter, I also used a pack of S-05 to try and clean out any of the flavors that may have been present due to yeast stress.
__________________
I'd rather have a bottle in front of me, than a frontal lobotomy.
--Tom Waits

You can't be a real country unless you have a beer and an airline - it helps if you have some kind of a football team, or some nuclear weapons, but at the very least you need a beer.
--Frank Zappa

My Cheap and Easy Stirplate

 
Reply With Quote
Old 12-30-2008, 05:48 PM   #8
Gammon N Beer
Recipes 
 
Dec 2007
WI
Posts: 714
Liked 10 Times on 10 Posts


Quote:
Originally Posted by Bobby_M View Post
It's definitely a delicate balance. You can go 155F on the mash temp, but you also have to edge up your IBUs to take care of the residual sweetness you'll be left with.
I did not want to hijack this thread, but Bobby did get me thinking. So, I posted a thread over in the, "Brewing Software" forum. In short, I am wondering if when using Beersmith will it change the hop IBU schedule if I change Mash Profiles in BS.

If I find it does, then the OP'er here may benefit by using a software package.

I dunno.

See: http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f84/mash...7/#post1033463

 
Reply With Quote
Old 12-30-2008, 05:57 PM   #9
Mutilated1
Beer Drenched Executioner
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
 
Mutilated1's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Jul 2007
Hoover, Alabama USA, Alabama
Posts: 2,150
Liked 39 Times on 27 Posts


Quote:
Originally Posted by Bobby_M View Post
It's definitely a delicate balance. You can go 155F on the mash temp, but you also have to edge up your IBUs to take care of the residual sweetness you'll be left with.
How noticeable is the difference between 153F and 155F ? Would there be anyway to objectively measure the difference ? I'd be interested in knowing the subjective differences (eg: taste? body? mouthfeel ?) that are noticed as well if you don't mind sharing.

Somehow I had gotten the (wrong?) idea that 153F was already on the warmer/more dextrines/more body end of the mash temperature spectrum and that 155-156 was beginning to get into the warm enough to stop conversion entirely spectrum.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 12-30-2008, 06:03 PM   #10
ajf
Senior Member
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
 
ajf's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Oct 2005
Long Island
Posts: 4,646
Liked 105 Times on 99 Posts


You could also try an English yeast. They tend not to strip out the malty flavours as much as the American yeasts, but may not be suitable for and American Ale.
Another option would be to use an English malt such as Maris Otter as the base malt. Plenty of Americans use that for American ales, and it adds a decidedly malty profile to the beer.

-a.

 
Reply With Quote
Reply
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
"5 Beers in 1 Huge Glass" idiots in advertising madewithchicken General Beer Discussion 32 08-15-2011 11:52 PM
Just started making some "Big Beers"... questions about pitching yeast and o2 h4rdluck Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 7 03-25-2011 02:28 AM
"This beer doesn't fit a style"- crazy beers SkinnyShamrock General Beer Discussion 22 06-04-2009 09:53 PM
"designing great beers", second edition? mikfire General Beer Discussion 2 05-31-2009 03:53 PM
Your best "secret" techniques? cweston General Techniques 68 01-18-2009 03:30 PM


Forum Jump