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Old 05-17-2006, 02:20 AM   #1
PhoenixCoyote
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May 2006
Phoenix, Arizona
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Hey Everybody,
Still new to homebrewing, only 3 batches so far. But i dislike the Ale aftertaste, just found that out. I am interested in making a fruit beer, they sound pretty tasty. Is there a certain kind of style that is best for this? Like a dark beer etc.? I have also heard of wheat beer and fruit. Since i dislike ale, can i make a fruit beer with a lager or pilsner instead? I live in AZ where it is very hot. A strawberry blond sounds good. Thank you all for your suggestions a comments.

 
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Old 05-17-2006, 02:30 AM   #2
timdsmith72
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Fruit is "As a General Rule" added to wheat beer. 5 to 6 lbs of chopped fresh fruit or puree added to the secondary. Except Cranberries. Just need 4 lbs of those or it'll be too tart. Assuming a 5 gal batch of course.

 
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Old 05-17-2006, 03:39 PM   #3
BeanPot Brewery
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Mar 2006
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I agree that a wheat beer is the best way to go for fruit. If you're really lazy, like me, you can always get a small bottle of fruit extract from your local homebrew store. The extract gets added at bottling time, so you don't have to deal with fruit in the secondary or anything like that. The real fruit tastes better, IMHO, but the extract tastes pretty good, too.

 
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Old 05-17-2006, 04:03 PM   #4
casebrew
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I wonder if you could learn something about fruit choices by looking at the menu at the LHBS? My Strawberry Tart is about like lemonade. I know that citrus wines use a bit of juice and lots of sugar to avoid excess acidity...
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Old 05-17-2006, 04:35 PM   #5
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Last weekend (Mother's Day) we had the famiily over for dinner, etc.

I added a spoonful of strawberries and syrup to my Hefe Weizen. It was great. I had a second one that way too.
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Old 05-17-2006, 06:11 PM   #6
Chairman Cheyco
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Quote:
Originally Posted by homebrewer_99
I added a spoonful of strawberries and syrup to my Hefe Weizen.

Didn't it beer-cano on you? How did you keep it from flooding all over the place?
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Old 05-17-2006, 06:53 PM   #7
sonvolt
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PhoenixCoyote
But i dislike the Ale aftertaste, just found that out.
IMHO, you should not settle on this opinion just yet. What yeasts have you been using? What are your fermentation temps? I suspect that it is some byproducts of your fermentation that you are responding to here. Some people really like those fruity, estery aftertastes that you can get with some ale yeast strains. Others don't.

Before you decide that you don't like ales, you should ferment with something like Safale 1056 (Chico strain, California Ale) or the Nottingham dried yeast. Both of these strains are described as very "clean" and "flocculent." They leave a very crisp and clean tasting beer. You may find that it is the character of specific ale strains that you dislike rather than ale itself.

Also, cooler fermentation temps will result in cleaner flavors.


[he sings] "All I am say . . . ing . . . . is give ale a chance."

 
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Old 05-17-2006, 07:04 PM   #8
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I know there are mixed opinions about The Brewing network here but I kinda like them so I'm gonna post a link to one of their shows.

Jamil Zainasheff (if you aren't sure who he is) has won the Homebrewer of the year award a ton of times and basically just knows his sh!t.

He does a biweekly show on different beer types and has done one on fruit beers. It's a great show with tons of info.

http://www.thebrewingnetwork.com/jamil.php

There is a link to an mp3 on that page.

just sharing some info i found interesting.

ws
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Old 05-17-2006, 07:43 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chairman Cheyco
Didn't it beer-cano on you? How did you keep it from flooding all over the place?
Add the fruit and syrup AFTER you pour the beer.
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Old 05-18-2006, 01:30 AM   #10
PhoenixCoyote
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May 2006
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sonvolt
IMHO, you should not settle on this opinion just yet. What yeasts have you been using? What are your fermentation temps? I suspect that it is some byproducts of your fermentation that you are responding to here. Some people really like those fruity, estery aftertastes that you can get with some ale yeast strains. Others don't.

Before you decide that you don't like ales, you should ferment with something like Safale 1056 (Chico strain, California Ale) or the Nottingham dried yeast. Both of these strains are described as very "clean" and "flocculent." They leave a very crisp and clean tasting beer. You may find that it is the character of specific ale strains that you dislike rather than ale itself.

Also, cooler fermentation temps will result in cleaner flavors.


[he sings] "All I am say . . . ing . . . . is give ale a chance."
Thanks for your reply. I used a beer kit from the HBS, the yeast came with it. It was a "brewers best" kit. All of my 3 batches were from these kits. That's all they carried besides all canned kits. My fermentation was in the low 70's in my primary, i did it back in december. I don'tlike the aftertaste of any of them. What did i do wrong? I have another kit i bought back in january, i will experiment with it. It is a Continental Pilsner. I use a plastic bucket one stage fermentation. One week then to bottles. Any help with getting a good tasting beer would be great. Thanks again.

 
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