Bottle Conditioning vs Carboy Conditioning. What's the difference? - Home Brew Forums

Register Now!
Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Beginners Beer Brewing Forum > Bottle Conditioning vs Carboy Conditioning. What's the difference?

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 12-13-2008, 05:03 AM   #1
BrewOnBoard
Recipes 
 
Dec 2008
Posts: 202
Liked 7 Times on 5 Posts



Like I said, what's the difference?

I understand the premise behind conditioning one's beer. I liked the analogy of a poster (revvy?) who compared it to letting chili sit for a day to mix flavors. So after fermentation is done, why then does the prudent brewer transfer to a secondary and THEN transfer to bottles? (I'm trying to grasp the concept of the secondary) How is time in a secondary better than the same amount of time spent in a bottle?

Bring on the wisdom!

BrewOnBoard

 
Reply With Quote
Old 12-13-2008, 05:33 AM   #2
devaspawn
 
devaspawn's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Feb 2008
Central VA
Posts: 937
Liked 3 Times on 3 Posts


Someone will probably pop in with the science behind it but the general consensus is that bulk aging is better. Meaning aging 5 gallons of beer in a single vessel is better than aging it in 54 individual significantly smaller vessels. Sorry that I can't explain it better than that but like I said, the general consensus...

From experience I can say that I have done the experiment where I have bulked aged a batch in a keg and aged a 12 pack and that "green" flavor is gone much sooner in the keg than the bottles.

__________________
Cry 'Havoc,' and let slip the dogs of war;
That this foul deed shall smell above the earth
With carrion men, groaning for burial.

Prim 1: Ogre's House Red Ale
Prim 2: Apfelwein

 
Reply With Quote
Old 12-13-2008, 06:38 AM   #3
homebrewer_99
 
homebrewer_99's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Feb 2005
Atkinson (near the Quad Cities), IL
Posts: 17,792
Liked 132 Times on 99 Posts


The secondary is used for clearing (allowing for more yeast to drop out of suspension). Without a secondary this extra yeast makes its way into your bottles.

The clearer the beer going into the bottle the cleaner the beer coming out.
__________________
HB Bill

Floored Likes This 
Reply With Quote
Old 12-13-2008, 06:43 AM   #4
Jaha35
 
Jaha35's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Dec 2008
Pawling, NY
Posts: 97

As far as I can see around the HB world, secondary fermentation or aging is done primarily for clearing the beer. this serves a couple purposes.

1. the beer is clearer so it looks nicer. You may not care but maybe you want to impress friends, etc.

2. It reduces the possibility of sediment in your bottles to stir up and get in your pour and possibly change some flavors.

3. It saves on cleanup because your bottles will be cleaner after pouring. Sediment hardens and is a pair to scrub out.

I have seen some argument for flavoring getting stronger in a secondary however I have seen a lot of warnings that too long in a secondary can actually hurt flavor more than help it. So it's all a matter of preference I suppose.
__________________
Primary 1: empty <=== How sad...
Primary 2: empty
Secondary: Otter's Altbier
Bottle Conditioning: Dovey's Broody Bitter Ale
Drinking: Monty's Irish Red Ale (MY FIRST HOME BREW!!!), Jaha's Root Beer
On Deck: Fuller's London Pride Clone, Newcastle Clone

Happy Holidays to all at HBT!!! Thanks for all the help. I have learned more from the great people on this forum than in any book or instruction manual!

"Life's too short to drink Domestic."

 
Reply With Quote
Old 12-13-2008, 06:45 AM   #5
blancothebronco
Recipes 
 
Jul 2008
NW burbs, IL
Posts: 19

Yeast are a social animal, they prefer to be among friends. 5 gallons of bulk aging lets them party harder than in a 12oz bottle. (this could be bull****, I'm pretty drunk and quite the newb)

 
Reply With Quote
Old 12-13-2008, 06:52 AM   #6
Righlander
 
Righlander's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Apr 2008
Largo Florida
Posts: 506
Liked 6 Times on 6 Posts


Well, there's pretty much going to be some sediment in your beer no matter what. So leaving it in the primary/secondary longer will get rid of more of it than if you bottle after like 10 days. That sediment is easily disturbed. And can create lame flavors. Why not have as little of it as possible in your beer? Clean beer is nice and clear. Why have a bunch of it sitting in the bottom of your bottles when you can get it almost totally out of the picture before it even touches the bottles. The less the better in my opinion. Bottles aren't secondaries!!!


 
Reply With Quote
Old 12-13-2008, 07:12 AM   #7
devaspawn
 
devaspawn's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Feb 2008
Central VA
Posts: 937
Liked 3 Times on 3 Posts


Quote:
Originally Posted by homebrewer_99 View Post
The secondary is used for clearing (allowing for more yeast to drop out of suspension). Without a secondary this extra yeast makes its way into your bottles.

The clearer the beer going into the bottle the cleaner the beer coming out.
...And with this yeast extra yeast in your bottles that didn't drop because you didn't use secondary and didn't give the beer long enough before you bottled you risk the "yeast farts" factor. Literally these are the worst farts that I CONSISTENTLY had when I first started brewing. Anyone can deal with the occasional HORRIBLE fart can deal with it. Those around you can deal with it. When it happens ALL the time it's not funny anymore. You gross yourself out. Bad times...

__________________
Cry 'Havoc,' and let slip the dogs of war;
That this foul deed shall smell above the earth
With carrion men, groaning for burial.

Prim 1: Ogre's House Red Ale
Prim 2: Apfelwein

sleepspeaking Likes This 
Reply With Quote
Old 12-13-2008, 07:21 AM   #8
BrewOnBoard
Recipes 
 
Dec 2008
Posts: 202
Liked 7 Times on 5 Posts


Quote:
Originally Posted by blancothebronco View Post
Yeast are a social animal, they prefer to be among friends. 5 gallons of bulk aging lets them party harder than in a 12oz bottle.
Awesome! Best explanation ever!

Quote:
Originally Posted by blancothebronco View Post
this could be bull****, I'm pretty drunk and quite the newb
Yes, I know.


Sweeeeeeeet!!!!!!!!!!!
BoB

 
Reply With Quote
Old 09-05-2015, 12:44 AM   #9
sleepspeaking
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
 
sleepspeaking's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Jul 2015
, Texas
Posts: 522
Liked 65 Times on 50 Posts


Quote:
Originally Posted by devaspawn View Post
...And with this yeast extra yeast in your bottles that didn't drop because you didn't use secondary and didn't give the beer long enough before you bottled you risk the "yeast farts" factor. Literally these are the worst farts that I CONSISTENTLY had when I first started brewing. Anyone can deal with the occasional HORRIBLE fart can deal with it. Those around you can deal with it. When it happens ALL the time it's not funny anymore. You gross yourself out. Bad times...

First time i have run across this, but i'm sure the same topic is discussed on the forums, but I've been dealing with the HORRIBLE issue for a week or two, and I am convinced that I will be using a secondary for everything now. After reading this i had that Ah -HA! moment. Secondary FTW!!!

 
Reply With Quote
Old 09-05-2015, 12:58 AM   #10
slym2none
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
 
slym2none's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Apr 2015
Durham, NC
Posts: 6,893
Liked 2274 Times on 1451 Posts


Threadsurrection!
__________________
.
"Hops are a wicked and pernicious weed." - King Henry VIII

 
Reply With Quote
Reply
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Bottle Conditioning vs. Carboy Conditioning Omahawk Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 4 08-15-2009 03:28 PM
Difference between bottle/keg-conditioning and secondary fermentation? bernerbrau Bottling/Kegging 9 07-14-2009 09:24 PM
Cold conditioning makes a difference Beerthoven General Techniques 1 03-17-2009 03:03 AM
cask conditioning vs bottle conditioning D*Bo Bottling/Kegging 6 07-05-2006 01:05 PM
Carboy Secondary Fermentation vs. Bottle Conditioning jaytee Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 7 01-02-2006 09:34 PM


Forum Jump