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Old 06-12-2009, 08:07 PM   #31
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Wow... he must have a raging club soda habit to have enough bottles!
Actually, at 79 cents he just dumps them out and fills them. They are already cleaned & sanitary and ready to go. For a five gallon batch he only needs 10, so for under 8 bucks he has new bottles that he does not have to wash ready to go.
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Old 06-18-2009, 07:34 PM   #32
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thats pretty ****ing dandy... I am going to buy some club sodas
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Old 06-19-2009, 05:42 AM   #33
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I've been using the same 2 liter pop bottles for going on three years now. They work great. Same caps too. I have 4 of them with carbonator caps on them so as soon as I bottle the 4 of them, I will force carb them with a paintball cannister and shake like crazy...carb again.....shake....carb again and shake. Keep doing this until the bottle doesn't go soft after shaking. The next day it's ready to drink. This way I have 4 beers ready to go right away while the others carbonate for three weeks or so.

Must drink pretty quickly though, they do tend to go flat after a couple of days.
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Old 07-07-2009, 10:32 PM   #34
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I'm sure for conventional beer sugar levels plastic soda bottles are fine. But I'm about to start my next batch of hard cranberry lemonade, and my last attempt had almost no sweetness to it. I have no access to a keg, so bottle carbonating is my only option, and many of my friends are lactose intolerant, AND I despise the taste of splenda. Quite restrictive eh?

I heard that soda bottles can withstand pressures up to 100psi, and also that most yeasts will go dormant long before this point (somewhere around 50-60psi, enough to blow a glass bottle). So if I simply backsweetened with plenty of corn/cane sugar, then bottled and let it carbonate, would the extra sugar stay there, unfermented, sweetening the batch? Or has there been a case of plastic bottle bombs?
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Old 07-07-2009, 11:20 PM   #35
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I'm sure for conventional beer sugar levels plastic soda bottles are fine. But I'm about to start my next batch of hard cranberry lemonade, and my last attempt had almost no sweetness to it. I have no access to a keg, so bottle carbonating is my only option, and many of my friends are lactose intolerant, AND I despise the taste of splenda. Quite restrictive eh?

I heard that soda bottles can withstand pressures up to 100psi, and also that most yeasts will go dormant long before this point (somewhere around 50-60psi, enough to blow a glass bottle). So if I simply backsweetened with plenty of corn/cane sugar, then bottled and let it carbonate, would the extra sugar stay there, unfermented, sweetening the batch? Or has there been a case of plastic bottle bombs?
Well, even if the bottles don't blow up, the yeast will eat the sugar and when you open the bottles, you'll have lemonade volcanoes. The highly carbonated drink will take the path of least resistance- right out of the top when you open it. Shake a bottle of root beer really hard and open it, if you want to get an idea of what pressure does to liquids.

If you use sugar, the yeast don't know when to stop. They won't stop at a certain psi- why would they? They'll stop when there are no more fermentables, or when the temperature is low enough for them to go dormant.

This can work if you wait until the bottles are hard, and then chill them to stop the yeast. The yeast won't be totally dormant, but the cold will slow them down.
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Old 07-08-2009, 02:22 AM   #36
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Thanks for the incredibly fast response, Yooper! I'm going to experiment with a bottle of water sugar and yeast with high levels of sugar and see how that fares over a few days of fermenting (filled nearly to the top), but I'll probably end up refrigerating the finished product.
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Old 07-08-2009, 04:05 AM   #37
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Those bottles will hold an incredible amount of pressure. They will blow up like a balloon before they explode.

I did an experiment with a two liter bottle once after racking a brew to the secondary. I scooped about half a cup of yeast from the fermenter and put it in the bottle along with a bunch of pancake syrup and table sugar. I filled it all the way with water, capped it, and put it outside.

The next day, the bottle was doubled in size, the label had ripped and fallen off, and the flower pot bottom had popped off.

On the third day, the bottle was more than triple in size. It was the size and shape of a water mellon. Later that morning, when I returned from class, everything within a 10 ft. radius was covered with foam, and the bottle was an un-recognizable piece of plastic. I had just missed the explosion.

I could have pulled some pranks with some of them!
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Old 07-08-2009, 04:56 AM   #38
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Regarding sweetening without creating geysers, you could add splenda. As far as I know, it's not fermentable, and will sweeten things up quite a bit.
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Old 08-10-2009, 01:19 AM   #39
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I have bottled into both 1 L club soda bottles and capped glass bottles for my first two batches, priming and bottling out of the same bucket for the glass and plastic, and the plastic club soda bottles have worked great. No taste difference at all. I'm sold on the simplicity and cost ($0.50 each).
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Old 08-13-2009, 05:18 PM   #40
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Originally Posted by BadlyEducated View Post
Thanks for the incredibly fast response, Yooper! I'm going to experiment with a bottle of water sugar and yeast with high levels of sugar and see how that fares over a few days of fermenting (filled nearly to the top), but I'll probably end up refrigerating the finished product.
Really your best bet would be to kill off the fermentation, and then force carbonate it instead of trying to walk the tightrope of carbing it naturally and keeping some residual sugars. Carbonator caps are pretty cheap, and you would just need to get a CO2 tank. It is more of an expense, but you'll have much finer control over your final product by doing it that way.
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