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Old 11-30-2008, 07:16 PM   #1
piranesi
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Nov 2008
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I am an experienced all grain brewer that has taken a few years off. I was given 2 packs of (old) flat tire Wyeast from my lhbs. I figured I could get it up to speed with a few lme starters. Seemed to work. The yeast is working fine, but I am getting some off cider smell. I am in temperature controlled first stage. Have I just been away too long and this is normal, or is the old yeast not giving the right character to the beer? Thanks

Also I have another batch of Sierra knock off that I am running three batches through the same yeast one after another. The yeast is working fast. I am getting down to proper FG in about 3-4 days. Should I cool the stuff down below recommended yeast temp or just move on to second stage when I hit my FG? I second stage in kegs.



 
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Old 11-30-2008, 07:28 PM   #2
WBC
 
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What temperature are you fermenting at and how long in the primary? If It's too high temp then that is not good. Old ingredients is another possible cause.


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Old 11-30-2008, 07:31 PM   #3
piranesi
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Nov 2008
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69-71 new ingredients


Quote:
Originally Posted by WBC View Post
What temperature are you fermenting at and how long in the primary? If It's too high temp then that is not good. Old ingredients is another possible cause.

 
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Old 11-30-2008, 11:12 PM   #4
WBC
 
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Yes that is too high a temperature because of exothermic heat from fermentation can raise the temperature from 5 to 8 degrees above the ambient air around the fermenter. You will find that if you keep the actual fermenting liquid at 65F to 66F that your ale will taste a lot better. A water bath and using ice will get this done for ales but lagers need a refrigerator and a temperature controller to effectively keep the temperature constant at 50F to 53F for lagers.

Did you taste the liquid from the starter before pitching the yeast? If a starter get's a slight infection (which can usually be tasted) then it can ruin a perfectly good brew.
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Cheers,
WBC

Fermentor 1: Bill's House Ale II, Fermentor 2: German Helles, Fermentor 3: Bill's Schworzbier (Black Bier)
Tap 1: Bill's House Ale II, Tap 2: German Hefewizen, Tap 3: Nut Brown Ale
Future Brews: Stone IPA Clone, Blonde Ale, Budvar Clone, Newcastle Clone
New toy: Blichmann 27 gallon fermentor


“If you find yourself in a hole, the first thing to do is stop digging”

“Good judgment comes from experience, and a lotta that comes from bad judgment”


 
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Old 12-01-2008, 03:58 AM   #5
piranesi
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Nov 2008
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That is the liquid temperature. I keep a sticky thermometer strip on each of the first stage carboys and regulate the refredgerator temp using those with a secondary brew regulator. Also the starter was boiled lme for 10 min. in a glass chemistry vase and immediately airlocked. Not much chance for infection. I will lower the temp to the low end ale temp though. That's probably it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by WBC View Post
Yes that is too high a temperature because of exothermic heat from fermentation can raise the temperature from 5 to 8 degrees above the ambient air around the fermenter. You will find that if you keep the actual fermenting liquid at 65F to 66F that your ale will taste a lot better. A water bath and using ice will get this done for ales but lagers need a refrigerator and a temperature controller to effectively keep the temperature constant at 50F to 53F for lagers.

Did you taste the liquid from the starter before pitching the yeast? If a starter get's a slight infection (which can usually be tasted) then it can ruin a perfectly good brew.



 
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