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Old 05-21-2012, 09:49 PM   #971
TarVolon
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Feb 2012
Durham, North Carolina
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Quote:
Originally Posted by agenthucky View Post
oh and a quick tip to see if you're likely to extract tannins by squeezing is to take a gravity reading of what comes out when you squeeze the bag. If it's below 1.010, you're probably extracting some tannins. this is when people stop sparging in a classic setup.
Thanks, will check that next time.

 
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Old 05-21-2012, 10:17 PM   #972
agenthucky
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Jan 2010
CT
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Originally Posted by TarVolon View Post
Yeah, I'd definitely turn the heat off 5-10 minutes before putting the kettle in to get rid of that burner problem. But even that didn't work the first time when I only left the door open long enough to put the kettle inside. I assume that the 4 degree increase means the ambient temperature in the oven was still in the mid-150s or higher. The goal was to get a uniform temperature around 150 degrees for insulation, but it makes it tricky when there's no 150 degree setting on the oven.
wow sounds like you have a great oven. Mine vents at the top, so it cools quickly. I'll lose temp after a certain amount of time. Do you cover your mash kettle?

 
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Old 05-21-2012, 10:26 PM   #973
TarVolon
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Feb 2012
Durham, North Carolina
Posts: 211
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Quote:
Originally Posted by agenthucky View Post
wow sounds like you have a great oven. Mine vents at the top, so it cools quickly. I'll lose temp after a certain amount of time. Do you cover your mash kettle?
I don't really know about my oven quality, because this is the first one I've ever had. But I did preheat to 170, turn it off, wait 10 minutes, put in a 6 gallon mash kettle with a glass lid, and still have the mash temperature raise from 148 to 152 over 75 minutes.

 
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Old 05-24-2012, 02:32 AM   #974
wormraper
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Jul 2011
Tucson, AZ
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being that I'm not a brewer who who brews multiple times a week or a month even (I will probably be brewing about once every 1 to 1 - 1/2 months on average unless I make a small 2.5 gallon batch for curiosity's sake. I only have ONE 5 gallon pot at the moment coming from Northern Brewers so would going all grain be worth it money wise to grab an extra 7 or 8 gallon pot (being that they cost $80 ish) in cost savings? I know "quality" of AG vs. Extract is debatable but I'd be looking at as a cost savings too.

 
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Old 05-24-2012, 02:56 AM   #975
agenthucky
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Jan 2010
CT
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There is a debate on quality of extract vs all grain? Like, seriously?

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Old 05-24-2012, 03:43 AM   #976
wfowlks
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Oct 2011
Worcester, MA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wormraper View Post
being that I'm not a brewer who who brews multiple times a week or a month even (I will probably be brewing about once every 1 to 1 - 1/2 months on average unless I make a small 2.5 gallon batch for curiosity's sake. I only have ONE 5 gallon pot at the moment coming from Northern Brewers so would going all grain be worth it money wise to grab an extra 7 or 8 gallon pot (being that they cost $80 ish) in cost savings? I know "quality" of AG vs. Extract is debatable but I'd be looking at as a cost savings too.
Go with the 20.5 gallon pot and you can do BIAB. I did they are on amazon cheap: http://www.amazon.com/Bayou-Classic-...sr=1-1-catcorr

I don't regret it and it comes in use for sooo many other things. Its a long term investment, and looking at it from an economics standpoint the initial investment pays off in the long run because of the durability and the multi-uses you will get out of it.

I've even lent it to friends for a few bucks or a beer for their brew day.

On a side note I got a lot of my BIAB expertise from http://www.brewgeeks.com/a-biab-brewday-scoundrel.html

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Old 05-24-2012, 03:45 AM   #977
wormraper
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Jul 2011
Tucson, AZ
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wfowlks View Post
Go with the 20.5 gallon pot and you can do BIAB. I did they are on amazon cheap: http://www.amazon.com/Bayou-Classic-...sr=1-1-catcorr

I don't regret it and it comes in use for sooo many other things. Its a long term investment, and looking at it from an economics standpoint the initial investment pays off in the long run because of the durability and the multi-uses you will get out of it.

I've even lent it to friends for a few bucks or a beer for their brew day
20.5 gallons?? damn, would I be able to even boil that much??? I have a flat top glass stove (one of those ones that don't have the old fashioned coils). I know a lot of people complain about more than 7 gallons)

 
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Old 05-24-2012, 03:50 AM   #978
agenthucky
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Jan 2010
CT
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wormraper View Post
20.5 gallons?? damn, would I be able to even boil that much??? I have a flat top glass stove (one of those ones that don't have the old fashioned coils). I know a lot of people complain about more than 7 gallons)

20.5 gallon is overkill, but the ability to boil depends on the diameter of the bottom of the kettle. Your stove will only heat a certain about of BTU, and it will disperse along the bottom of the kettle. It's possible to use a 20 gallon pot if it is tall, but wider hurts the heat distribution. 7 gallons is plenty, I use a 22 QT pot and get away with a little under 5 gallons.

all in all, that's not an awful price for a 20 gallon pot.

 
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Old 05-24-2012, 03:54 AM   #979
wfowlks
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Oct 2011
Worcester, MA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wormraper View Post
20.5 gallons?? damn, would I be able to even boil that much??? I have a flat top glass stove (one of those ones that don't have the old fashioned coils). I know a lot of people complain about more than 7 gallons)
I originally had a 9 gallon and I could bring that to a boil on my glass top stove. The 20 gallon actually covers several burners, additionally if you use reflectix around it that helps as well. But IMO solid investment. I currently do stovetop when its cold out and burner when its nicer out.

Its worked for me so far, and I've been able to get higher efficiency, because I can put all the water in it, and a faster boil because there is more surface area touching the burners.

 
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Old 05-24-2012, 04:01 AM   #980
wormraper
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Jul 2011
Tucson, AZ
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hmm, I could do a 9 0r 10 gallon pot pretty easily then. was just wondeirng if I only do 6-12 brews a year whether the $75 or so to buy the second pot would be worth the cost savings by switching to all grain

 
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