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Old 04-18-2006, 01:50 PM   #1
cweston
 
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So, as I understand it, the purpose of the mash-out is to raise the temp of the mash to a point where all conversion is stopped, correct?

Is this still necessary in a batch sparge, where much more hot water comes in contact with the grains much faster, and the wort ends up in the boiling pot much sooner?

I want to keep it simple for my first AG attempts, but I don't want to cut any corners that will impact the basic quality of the beer.
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Old 04-18-2006, 01:53 PM   #2
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I've done it both ways batch sparging and haven't noticed any difference. I'm getting into the habit of it because it should make the wort less viscous and hopefully run off more sugars, but since I'm boiling in 15-20 minutes after starting my first batch sparge, I don't worry too much about denaturing the enzymes. Just my experience.

 
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Old 04-18-2006, 02:14 PM   #3
sonvolt
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What are the consequences of not getting a good mash out? In other words, what if the grain bed's temp never gets high enough during mash out? What will happen to the resulting wort/beer?

 
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Old 04-18-2006, 02:19 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sonvolt
What are the consequences of not getting a good mash out? In other words, what if the grain bed's temp never gets high enough during mash out? What will happen to the resulting wort/beer?
It depends, and quite a lot I suspect on how long you're sparging as well as whether or not you start boiling as you collect, or afterwards.

Basically, the mash will not become as viscous so you may lose some efficiency due to some sugars/stuff not being rinsed out. Maybe think about how it's easier to rinse soap off your hands with hot water as opposed to cold water.

Another factor is that enzymes in the mash will not be denatured at the lower temps and will continue to chew away while you sparge which may result in less body than you were shooting for.

 
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Old 04-18-2006, 02:21 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cweston
I want to keep it simple for my first AG attempts, but I don't want to cut any corners that will impact the basic quality of the beer.
I think you can safely omit the mash-out for your first AG attempt. Just start heating the wort as it comes into your brew pot. You may even bring it to a boil and get a hot break while you get ready to sparge again. This will make dealing with boil-overs much easier if you only have a small pot (like me).

Eventually, observing the mash-out is a good habbit. It will bring your mashing to a halt after a predetermined amout of time. This may make repeating the desired attenuation easier. But keep in mind, that for saccrification with alpha and beta amylase activity, the actual rest temperature may have a greater affect on the attenuation, than the rest time. But the affect of time should still not be forgotten here.



Kai


 
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Old 04-18-2006, 02:25 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kaiser
But time should still not be forgotten here.
That's profound, man.

 
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Old 04-18-2006, 02:35 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Baron von BeeGee
That's profound, man.
OOOps, I fixed the post. Once in a while I just have to pull one of those

Kai

 
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Old 04-18-2006, 02:37 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kaiser
But the affect of time should still not be forgotten here.
I am reminded of this each morning when I look in the mirror.
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Old 04-18-2006, 02:40 PM   #9
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I batch sparge & most of the time, I have enough room in the mash tun to just add a couple gallons of hot water and recirculate until the bed is settled. Back when I fly sparged, I'd mash out anything with a lot of rye, wheat or oatmeal.
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