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Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > General Techniques > Aging beer: Facts, myths, and discussion
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Old 09-29-2012, 08:59 PM   #251
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Nice post, some good ideas and advice. I only wish I had your sense of organization. It seems I seldom use the same procedure twice. It's a good thing that brewing can be so forgiving in a lot of ways. Despite my worst efforts I almost routinely get good tasting — not prize worthy I'm sure — but beers my wife and i enjoy more than anything that we get from the supermarket.


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Old 01-12-2013, 04:40 AM   #252
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There's way too much here to read in my current state ;-) but I want to add something about big beers in case no one's said it yet. I routinely get fast turnarounds on my big beers, too! The key (including all the steps in the original post sans "keep it small") is to pitch onto a big cake of a yeast that flocks well (and agitate!). I've gone from brew day to bottle or keg with many barleywines and iipas in three weeks by racking them on cakes of Fuller's yeast from ESBs with delicious results. Caveat - this might not be a good idea if you get lots of trub in your beers.


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Old 01-18-2013, 02:42 PM   #253
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How well does low ABV homebrew age? With something like a low ABV spiced beer that's going to take a while to infuse is this going to be a problem?
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Old 01-18-2013, 03:47 PM   #254
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Arrheinous View Post
How well does low ABV homebrew age? With something like a low ABV spiced beer that's going to take a while to infuse is this going to be a problem?
Hard to predict with a low ABV spiced beer without knowing what one it is. In general low ABV styles don't age well since there isn't much in them that improves with age.

Spice infusion depends on how you treated the spice in the first place...did it go in whole or ground? Does it dissolve in water or alcohol? I could imagine a situation where a spice becomes overwhelming because the beer backbone degrades with time throwing the balance out of whack.
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Old 01-18-2013, 04:57 PM   #255
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All dried, solid spices I ground by hand. Cinnamon sticks, black/red/white peppercorn, star anise, anise seed, candied ginger, and some cilantro that was in with the peppercorn. It's gonna be interesting. They're at reasonable levels. Some wormwood in there from the boil - if it turns into a Jager beer I wouldn't complain. And if it's too strong I'll just mix it.

I did a month in primary in a better bottle, then added honey and spices a week ago.The honey kicked off some CO2 I'm hoping blankets the headspace. Shoulda let them sit in vodka or brewed a spice tea and added it - my first go at adding dried goods. They came right out of the new containers so no contamination other than what was already there and the ginger was technically boiled.

My apartment is 60F where the fermenter is now and 55F or less in the basement. I'm planning on bottling when it starts to warm up outside and then use the spring temps to bottle condition.
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Old 02-11-2013, 08:01 PM   #256
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I just wanted to offer my experience. I typically wait 3 weeks to bottle my beer, but recently I tried bottling some batches at 14-17 days (I don't use a secondary and I usually crash cool in the 30s-40s for a couple days). While the beer tasted perfectly fine, each batch came out over carbed. I assume there was still a fair amount of CO2 in suspension that threw off my priming estimates. I'd probably package sooner if I kegged where I could better control carbonation levels, but waiting 3-4 weeks before bottling seems to give me more predictable results. Has anyone else experienced this?
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Old 02-14-2013, 02:19 AM   #257
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Originally Posted by Yuri_Rage View Post
"If you see a beer, do it a favor, and drink it. Beer was not meant to age." -- Michael Jackson

Fact: Budweiser goes from grain to bottle in 28 days.

Source: Modern Marvels, History Channel; USA Today
Whoa....Budweiser uses grain?
Haha Great post. I think i am going to try going from primary to keg. I just started doing 5G Cornys. I'll be sure to be a proud poster of my first pour.
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Old 03-15-2013, 02:24 PM   #258
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jwalker1140 View Post
I just wanted to offer my experience. I typically wait 3 weeks to bottle my beer, but recently I tried bottling some batches at 14-17 days (I don't use a secondary and I usually crash cool in the 30s-40s for a couple days). While the beer tasted perfectly fine, each batch came out over carbed. I assume there was still a fair amount of CO2 in suspension that threw off my priming estimates. I'd probably package sooner if I kegged where I could better control carbonation levels, but waiting 3-4 weeks before bottling seems to give me more predictable results. Has anyone else experienced this?
By day 14, the beer should have been done fermenting and no new co2 would occur between then and day 28 anyway. So the overcarbed beer must be due to overpriming.

I'm not sure what a "carbing estimate" is, but for most beers (including German lagers), I use .75 ounce- 1 ounce of corn sugar per finished gallon of beer.
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Old 03-15-2013, 02:55 PM   #259
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I'm certain no extra CO2 is being created after day 14. Most of my beers are pretty much done in 7-10 days. I just think the extra week in primary allows more of the CO2 that's left over from fermentation to come out of solution.

Sorry, by "priming estimate" I was basically referring to the calculator in BeerSmith that tells me how much sugar to use to reach 2.6 vols, or whatever my target is. 4 oz of corn sugar in my beers bottled in 14 days consistently has more carbonation than the same beers when bottled in 21 days, at least that's been my experience.
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Old 07-21-2013, 11:36 PM   #260
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Rogue Dead Guy is grain to glass in 8 days. Now that I'm really dialed in on my yeast and have my pure O2 system going well, I'm at 14 days grain the glass on just about everything. Styles that aren't dry hopped are in the keg on day 10.


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