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Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > General Techniques > Aging beer: Facts, myths, and discussion
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Old 10-24-2011, 04:32 PM   #221
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I parrot this thread constantly, link to it often as well. Great info when used with some thought and understanding.

Good to see people still reading and learning based on info here!


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Old 10-27-2011, 11:26 PM   #222
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I didn't read through this thread, but like 80% of my beers are 9%+ ABV and are keg stored in my basement for a minimum of 6 months before I touch them. Most come out awesome, IMHO.


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Old 10-28-2011, 03:25 AM   #223
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yuri_Rage View Post
Pitch a lot of yeast, and pitch it right. As long as you're brewing a style that doesn't call for esters, fusels, or other yeast-produced flavors, give the yeast a little help. With liquid yeast, make a big starter. Step it up to nearly one gallon (for a five gallon batch), decant the starter beer, and pitch the slurry. Always rehydrate dry yeast in clean water, and pitch a little extra if you have it (I've been using 15g of S-04 or US-05 per six gallon batch). Pitch the yeast into wort that is within 5F of the intended fermentation temperature. Note that I've mentioned nothing about aeration. That's because I don't worry about it. I just pitch lots of healthy yeast so they won't have to reproduce much. It works...I promise.
Are you saying that you don't aerate any of your beers at all? I know that pitching a lot of yeast will reduce the length of the lag phase of fermentation but does this really produce the same quality beer in the end (good attenuation, flavor, etc.) compared to those that were well aerated? Just curious to hear from those who don't aerate their wort.

I'd love to be able to simplify my brewing process by skipping the aeration... but I hesitate to test this out on a real batch of brew that I spent time and money making.
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Old 10-28-2011, 12:30 PM   #224
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Seven View Post
Are you saying that you don't aerate any of your beers at all? I know that pitching a lot of yeast will reduce the length of the lag phase of fermentation but does this really produce the same quality beer in the end (good attenuation, flavor, etc.) compared to those that were well aerated? Just curious to hear from those who don't aerate their wort.

I'd love to be able to simplify my brewing process by skipping the aeration... but I hesitate to test this out on a real batch of brew that I spent time and money making.
I don't aerate other than a few seconds of shaking, if I remember at all. Have not seen any negative effect for this on "normal sized" beer (<1.070 OG).


I have a RIS going now that wasi at 1.100 OG that I didn't aerate either but pitched onto a yeast slurry from a APA brewed 2 weeks before it. Fermentation took by 48 hours (the soonest I checked it) and I'll see where it is this weekend (2 week mark).

What I do make sure to do it make an appropriate starter, sometimes larger than what is suggested by Mr. Malty.

I have no doubt that dissolved oxygen is required by yeast for reproduction. What I'm unsure about is what that requirement looks like when you've bypassed "in-wort" yeast reproduction (at least to a certain extent) by making a big starter.

I understand the "it can't hurt" motivation behind wort oxygenation and if using it makes people feel better about their fermentation, then go for it. For me, I think the CRITICAL thing is getting the proper amount of yeast cells for the OG into the beer, early in the game (first 24 hours of making the wort).
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Old 10-28-2011, 12:55 PM   #225
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For me, I think the CRITICAL thing is getting the proper amount of yeast cells for the OG into the beer, early in the game (first 24 hours of making the wort).
Proper amount of healthy yeast cells for the OG. Oxygenating helps tremendously with this. What's the purpose of culturing an adequate number of yeast if they're going to be stressed and have diminished viability?
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Old 10-29-2011, 01:20 AM   #226
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Originally Posted by PseudoChef

Proper amount of healthy yeast cells for the OG. Oxygenating helps tremendously with this. What's the purpose of culturing an adequate number of yeast if they're going to be stressed and have diminished viability?
I brewed a high gravity Saison 2 weeks ago with a starting gravity of 1.084. I wasn't thinking and realized 10 minutes before pitching the yeast that I forgot to make a starter. I aerated, and I had vigorous fermentation by the next morning and finished at 1.008. There's no doubt in my mind that aeration works.
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Old 10-29-2011, 03:37 PM   #227
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There's too many variables in homebrewing to be able to have "no doubt in your mind" about your conclusion, sorry.
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Old 10-29-2011, 04:03 PM   #228
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Ideally you want to pitch 25% of the total yeast needed to do the fermentation. 50% of the culture are daughter cells (as long as you don't pitch more than 50%.) The amount of O2 used for reproduction will very with the pitch rate, extra will get scrubbed out by CO2. I don't see any reason to not aerate. I think brewers that have huge improvements form using pure O2 were not aerating very well.
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Old 11-16-2011, 08:32 PM   #229
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Default yeasty beer

The last couple of batches I have brewed have been more yeasty than normal. I have not changed up my technique much (even though I experiment often - which I do not consider a change since I do this often) I was reading in a different post that water could possibly cause this?
I have been using bottled water until recently and realized this is one of few things I have changed. Is this likely the problem?
Do you most people use tap or bottled water?
If using tap does the process take longer and I am not being patient?

Anyone have any input?

All suggestions and input greatly appreciated.
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Old 11-17-2011, 02:18 PM   #230
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Originally Posted by the_sloth View Post
The last couple of batches I have brewed have been more yeasty than normal. I have not changed up my technique much (even though I experiment often - which I do not consider a change since I do this often) I was reading in a different post that water could possibly cause this?
I have been using bottled water until recently and realized this is one of few things I have changed. Is this likely the problem?
Do you most people use tap or bottled water?
If using tap does the process take longer and I am not being patient?

Anyone have any input?

All suggestions and input greatly appreciated.
Well if you are a follower of John Palmer, he believes the composition of tap water is vital to the outcome of the beer. That is why Ireland can make such amazing stouts but couldnt produce a world-class Pale Ale and why a Belgian stout would be frowned upon. He recommends for tap water users to get their city Water Report and look at chlorine, magnesium, saline and many other levels and to add countermeasures accordingly. Read his How to Brew online (i think its on his site at BYO.com). It reads like a chemistry textbook but theres method in that madness. For myself, I just buy the bottled and brew away.
You may also consider that you might be bottling too soon, with active yeast still at work or that your yeast starters are under developed.
Good luck.


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