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Old 10-13-2008, 08:54 PM   #11
Saccharomyces
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Great post.

Two things I would add:

1) Cutting 1/2" off the dip tube of the keg helps avoid sediment before it has had a chance to compact completely.

2) Some yeast aren't very flocculant (eg Kolsch) so for those beers it can help to fine with gelatin, isinglass, or KC finings a few days before transferring to drop out the yeast, and then transfer/crash cool. For the bottlers they will have to stick with gelatin. http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f13/gela...12/#post543966

I did Orfy's mild grain to glass in 14 days. It was perfect.


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Old 10-13-2008, 08:55 PM   #12
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+1 on the pitch rate: Around the 6mo mark after I started brewing, I had about 3 consecutive brews that never fully attenuated. That's pretty much when I started making big starters and pitching tons of yeast. Since then I've never had a beer not finish where I wanted it... and since I mostly use wlp001 that's pretty low on the hydro!


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Old 10-13-2008, 09:06 PM   #13
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I'm with TexLaw:

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Originally Posted by TexLaw View Post
I pitch large quanities of healthy yeast from a starter.
Quote:
Fermenting at proper temperatures (and, I only mean "proper," not "precise") goes a long way toward acheiving quick drinkability. Even if you pitch a larger starter, letting your temperature get out of whack can make for some rough beer.
These two factors are the most frequent ones I encounter when I sample homebrews that exhibit off-flavors. For many brewers paying attention to making the yeast happy will make the difference between so-so (or terrible) homebrew and award-winning homebrew.
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Old 10-13-2008, 09:35 PM   #14
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Originally Posted by Saccharomyces View Post
I'm with TexLaw:





These two factors are the most frequent ones I encounter when I sample homebrews that exhibit off-flavors. For many brewers paying attention to making the yeast happy will make the difference between so-so (or terrible) homebrew and award-winning homebrew.
So with everyone saying its important to have a high pitch rate, would making a starter out of dry yeast make any noticable improvements?
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Old 10-13-2008, 09:37 PM   #15
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I've been a proponent of the quick turnaround for a long time.

I can get a great beer (1.045 ish or below) from grain to glass inside of 21 days.

One Caveat: If I'm going to keg and chill, then plan to bottle some off using the BMBF and store those bottles at room temp...I'll give the beer more time in the fermenter at room temp first.

It seems there is just enough residual sugars in quick beers that returning them to room temp in bottles restarts CO2 production and overcarb'd beers.

This one is 20 days:
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Old 10-13-2008, 09:38 PM   #16
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With dry yeast, no. If you want more yeast just pitch more yeast. It's cheap.

1 11g package of dry yeast is roughly equivalent to a 1.5L starter of liquid yeast. For a normal gravity beer, that is adequate. I like Jamil's calculator, takes the guesswork out of it: Mr Malty Pitching Rate Calculator. For White Labs under viability, use the date four months before the "best by" date. I don't recall what it is for Wyeast but I think it says on the package.
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Old 10-13-2008, 11:19 PM   #17
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I am able to go from grain to glass in as little as 19 days. And I bottle!
Fermentation is complete with sprinkled dry yeast in 5 days.
I leave the ale in the primary for another 7 days to clear ( so total 12 days in primary)
I bottle, and sample at 7 days. It's usually well carbonated and crystal clear. (at room temp in the bottle anyways)
Another week in the bottle improves the beer somewhat but after that I drink it every day.
I don't understand the logic behind leaving the ale in primary any longer than 12-14 days.
I don't understand the logic of transferring ales to secondary and waiting longer.
I don't understand why some guys can't get their ales to carbonate in well under 14 days in the bottle.
I always save some bottles to age longer, but they don't really seem to improve much after two weeks or so in the bottle.
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Old 10-13-2008, 11:33 PM   #18
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I must say I am inspired...for my Irish Red next week I'll leave it in primary for 12-14 days and bottle. I haven't produced a beer in under a month yet, I've used a secondary for all 27 I've brewed. The beer does seem to go through changes over time, but I'll see how this does for me. I don't have the stuff for bigger starters (only have a 1L flask) and my fermentation temp isn't perfect but quite good, 67-70 degrees at all times but it varies with day/night. 2L flask and fermentation chamber are soon to come!
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Old 10-14-2008, 12:27 AM   #19
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New brewer here, And I have heard elsewhere on this forum that force carbing is not recommended. For the pros out there who have done both, what is the difference in beer quality between force carbing a corny, and just letting it condition naturally(if any)?

 
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Old 10-14-2008, 12:31 AM   #20
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Quote:
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what is the difference in beer quality between force carbing a corny, and just letting it condition naturally?
ZERO...except that a primed/naturally carbed keg will have sediment in the bottom, so your first few pours are cloudy.


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