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Old 05-13-2009, 02:28 PM   #121
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dfohio View Post
My beer is still tongue numbingly bitter after 3 weeks in the primary. It usually takes another 3 weeks in the bottle to settle down. How are you getting these fast turn arounds? Do I just have a low threshold for bitterness or am I not doing something I should be doing.
If your water is hard (particularly if high in carbonates), this can lead to a harsh bitterness (been there). You can either mess with your water, or add less bittering hops
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Old 05-19-2009, 03:13 AM   #122
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MOD EDIT: FACT...if you quote a really long post, you're likely to get modded!

FACT
Keeping beer warmer will make it age faster (do not ferment it warmer.) After a week or so let it warm up. The "conditioning" of off flavors will happen faster. The melding of the malts will happen faster. Unfortunately, hop flavors will go away faster as well.

After a week of fermentation temps I have kept my fermenter at 70-80F (I don't pay that much attention to them after that.) I really do think at those higher temps the beer may age as much as twice as fast. It carbs much faster at those temps too (I regularly see complete carbonation in less than a week.) Yeast really like it.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Randy Mosher
"All the process of aging in beer are accelerated by heat."
I'm not sugesting cooking beer, just keeping it comfortable. I'm quite comfortable up to 85f and think beer is too. Long term storage is out of the question. Most beer is not meant to be aged anyway.
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Old 05-19-2009, 04:02 AM   #123
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One point I haven't seen in here.

Dear noob,

Make sure your fermentation chamber cooler and pitching rate are kinda matched. If you pitch one smack pack and have no temperature controller at all, you're gonna be fine. If you make a one quart starter of wort and start your yeast a day or two ahead you are gonna have a wash tub tied up a few days and you are going to need a lot of ice, ten pounds a a time every twelve hours or so.

If you come up with a one gallon slurry you are going to need something that can suck some BTUs out of your fermenter, because those yeast are going to generate some heat.

P

 
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Old 06-03-2009, 06:11 AM   #124
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Conroe View Post
[SIZE="1"]
...FACT
Keeping beer warmer will make it age faster (do not ferment it warmer.) After a week or so let it warm up. The "conditioning" of off flavors will happen faster. The melding of the malts will happen faster. Unfortunately, hop flavors will go away faster as well...

100000% correct!!!

i learned the hard way. made a cream ale.. close cousin to steam ale. anyhoo, it stayed room temp at `60-75F for total of 2 months before i kegged it. then carb at 5psi and same temps. (no keezer yet). a week of solid drinking later and then one night between pints it 'went' stale. luckily under a gal was left so i choked it down the following day with my boss at lunch...

Reason: um

 
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Old 07-03-2009, 12:38 PM   #125
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Greetings! Fusel Oils In Aging Beer - It Burns So Good!
It’s really the only thing most of us think of when we hear the word “alcohol”. I say most of us because as beer geeks everywhere know, ethanol isn’t the only alcohol present in beer.

There’s actually a whole host of alcohols floating around in your brews which are collectively referred to as Fusel Oils. These molecules are also sometimes called higher alcohols, because they’re more complicated and much larger in size then plain old ethanol. Some of the more common fusel oils seen in beer include such compounds such as propanol, butanol, and isoamyl alcohol. Beer styles such as barleywines, imperial stouts, and strong bocks are the most common places you’ll encounter these strong molecules.

The most common sensation associated with fusel alcohols is a “hot”, almost spicy flavor that can create a feeling of warmth in your mouth or the back of your throat as your drink. You may also find it presenting itself as a solvent-like flavor in your beer. Fusel oils can often be detected with just a simple sniff of your brew - look for a strong, almost wine-like character to the smell.
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Old 07-17-2009, 08:06 PM   #126
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Is bottle conditioning simply going straight from primary to the bottles and bypassing a secondary fermentation stage? If I let my beer sit in secondary for 2+ weeks and then bottled it how long do I have to let it "bottle condition" until it's ready to drink? I've read books where it says only 7-10 days in the bottle, but many on here say at least 3 weeks.

Is there a way I can visibly tell that the beer is carbonated or do I have to taste it to check? I ask this because I bottled my beer in .5L bottles and I'd rather not waste an entire bottle of beer simply to check if it's carbed or not.


 
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Old 07-18-2009, 03:27 PM   #127
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Quote:
Originally Posted by McBrewski View Post
Is bottle conditioning simply going straight from primary to the bottles and bypassing a secondary fermentation stage? If I let my beer sit in secondary for 2+ weeks and then bottled it how long do I have to let it "bottle condition" until it's ready to drink? I've read books where it says only 7-10 days in the bottle, but many on here say at least 3 weeks.

Is there a way I can visibly tell that the beer is carbonated or do I have to taste it to check? I ask this because I bottled my beer in .5L bottles and I'd rather not waste an entire bottle of beer simply to check if it's carbed or not.
Squeeze it if it's plastic. If not, open it and try. If good, enjoy! If not, add a little more sugar, close it, and turn over a couple times to let it go again. Check a different bottle in another week.

Personally, I go 5-7 days in primary, 2 weeks in carboy secondary, and minimum one month in bottles with sugar added.

 
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Old 07-22-2009, 06:32 PM   #128
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Also, I gave my brother one of my bottles of beer only a week after bottling it not knowing that I should be bottle conditioning for three weeks. He put it in his fridge for a few days until I told him to take it out due to the yeast becoming dormant in cooler temperatures. Did it being in the fridge kill off the yeasts and sugars that would carbonate it or simply put the carbonation process on "pause" until he took it out and put it in his closet?

Main point: Will the beer still carbonate?

 
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Old 07-22-2009, 06:54 PM   #129
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Quote:
Originally Posted by McBrewski View Post
Also, I gave my brother one of my bottles of beer only a week after bottling it not knowing that I should be bottle conditioning for three weeks. He put it in his fridge for a few days until I told him to take it out due to the yeast becoming dormant in cooler temperatures. Did it being in the fridge kill off the yeasts and sugars that would carbonate it or simply put the carbonation process on "pause" until he took it out and put it in his closet?

Main point: Will the beer still carbonate?
Yes it will.just put it a area above 55.
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Old 07-22-2009, 06:59 PM   #130
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yes, if he warmed it up, it will carbonate.

 
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