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Old 10-04-2008, 05:56 AM   #1
Whisler85
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I'm on probably my 15th batch of beer, and to date ive had one beer that was too flat, two or three that were just right, and the rest have been WAY over carbonated. Even the addition of miniscule amounts of priming sugar makes for bottles that foam over when opened, making most of the brews undrinkable (sometimes they can be drank if I treat them like eggshells and pour slowly enough, but sometimes just the opening starts it spurting)

I usually leave my beers in the primary for a minimum of one week, but most of them have spent at least two weeks in the primary, so i don't think i am bottling too early?

Help! I need to figure this out before I invest more money in brews im just going to spill all over the place!

 
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Old 10-04-2008, 06:20 AM   #2
Edcculus
 
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Are you saying you primary for 1-2 weeks then bottle? This is way too soon to be bottling. Also, how long are you letting them sit in the bottles before drinking?

Leave it in the primary for at least 2 weeks. 3 would be better. If you want to bulk age, dry hop etc, move it to a secondary.

Also, you should use some brewing software like Beersmith to calculate your priming sugar. The program asks you how many volumes of CO2 you want and the temperature of the beer. By taking into account the residual CO2, it will tell you exactly how much priming sugar you need by weight. If you really want to nail things down, you need a small digital scale to measure your priming sugar by weight.

Third: leave your beer to bottle condition for 21 days. You might need more if you are priming with DME. Next, move your bottles to the refrigerator for a few days before consuming.

 
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Old 10-04-2008, 06:51 AM   #3
Throckmorton
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I have a similar problem that I just posted in a seperate string. I have beer that I've had in the primary for 1 week, 2 in the seconday, and 2 in the bottle. Although carbonated, they don't form a good head. I've considered adding additional sugar (small amt) but have been concerned with having the same problem you now are encountering. Is the issue simply just to give the beer more time, rather than more sugar? Thanks!!!

 
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Old 10-04-2008, 10:23 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Throckmorton View Post
I have a similar problem that I just posted in a seperate string. I have beer that I've had in the primary for 1 week, 2 in the seconday, and 2 in the bottle. Although carbonated, they don't form a good head. I've considered adding additional sugar (small amt) but have been concerned with having the same problem you now are encountering. Is the issue simply just to give the beer more time, rather than more sugar? Thanks!!!
Priming sugar will not give you more head. Using certain types of grain while brewing will help.

check here:
http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f13/head-retention-82512/
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Old 10-04-2008, 12:49 PM   #5
hoss75
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What is the environment you store your beer in?

 
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Old 10-04-2008, 01:17 PM   #6
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Welcome to HBT!
After reading your post, I'm surprised you haven't had bottle bombs. If I read that correctly, you are bottling 1 - 2 week old beers. I think you will find you have better beer if you leave it in primary for 3-4 weeks before bottling. Putting it in secondary for clearing and aging is optional but you want to make sure the yeast has actually finished their job before bottling.
How much priming sugar are you using and do you have a scale to measure it?
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Old 10-04-2008, 04:27 PM   #7
BigKahuna
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Whisler85 View Post
I usually leave my beers in the primary for a minimum of one week, but most of them have spent at least two weeks in the primary, so i don't think i am bottling too early?
Your New Mantra:
Beer Stays In Primary For 2 Weeks MINIMUM!

There are a few standard practices that you will read about that should either be modified or ignored completely! The 1-2-3 rule is one of them! 2 weeks minimum in primary, you can eliminate the secondary completely in most cases, and after 21 days, you're only trying your beer to satisfy your curiosity...then leave it for another 2 - 3 weeks in most cases. If you're doing a wit or a heffe or an IPA or something, there are exceptions, but in general....go as long as you can wait, then give it another week.
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Old 10-04-2008, 04:33 PM   #8
Tenchiro
 
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I never bottle anything until it has been conditioning for at least 3 weeks, if you bottle early and there is still active fermentation going on then your bottles can easily be over carbed.

Generally after 3 weeks I rack the beer in the bottling bucket overnight after I have put the priming sugar in the bottom. It seems to allow for a very even distribution.
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Old 10-04-2008, 05:52 PM   #9
Whisler85
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i HAVE tried letting beers ferment in the carboy longer. After having this problem with early brews, i left my chocolate-oatmeal stout in the primary for two weeks, and in the secondary for more than a month! i used wyeast irish ale, and kept it at 68-70 degrees for good attenuation, but two weeks after bottling, it has way to much pressure and way too much head. I have the feeling that incomplete fermentations are my problem. Could it be that my temperature control is bad? Could it be a problem with extract brewing?

 
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Old 10-04-2008, 05:56 PM   #10
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could be....Also, 1 oz of sugar per gallon...3/4 cup per 5 gallon batch...this is commonly misunderstood.

Other than that, infection is your only other likely cause.
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