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Old 02-08-2010, 11:40 PM   #21
ArcaneXor
 
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I bulk age in the primary or secondary, so I start cracking open my bottles after about 7-10 days. Things carbonate pretty quickly in Florida because room temperatures tend to be higher than in most other parts of the U.S.

 
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Old 02-09-2010, 12:37 AM   #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Revvy View Post
I have to say I'm impressed, it's not often we get someone new (ish) on here touting the benefits of waiting!

Obviously it's better to wait, but getting a new brewer not to sample the beer and start a new is my beer ruined thread, is a goal that many of us subscribe to, so we try to get them to at least wait out the minimum...
I completely agree with Revvy that the goal is to not sample the beer and start a new thread that you ruined a batch. Thankfully because of Revvy and many others in this group I was not at all concerned that my beer was just okay after 10 days in the bottle. Hey, it was by first homebrew and my birthday.

With opening my first beer after 10 days and now about another three weeks later I am appreciating the conditioning/aging process. Now I am saving two-three bottles of each batch in a closet for an extended conditioning time.

Since it seems as though you are doing your background work by being on this site to get info, I think that I would encourage you to try one bottle early. This way you can taste the difference between a properly conditioned bottle and one that was too early. But only do this if you are not going to freak out about a ruined beer.

I'm working on my pipeline so that I don't have to struggle with my waiting for my best if opened after _____ date.

 
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Old 12-03-2012, 05:21 PM   #23
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It depends on the style, the batch and then what you mean by "good." I have a stout that finished just fine after a week and a half. It's FG was 1.012, as expected. I bottled it and within a week the carbonation was perfect so I dropped the temperature on it and started drinking it regularly. It tasted great. I did notice however that as we went along for a couple weeks drinking this batch (my wife and I limited ourselves to no more than 2 in a night and often drink none, so beer can last pretty good around our place), the flavor profile changed and things swapped places--thinks that predominated got muted and some things that were muted came to the fore. Over time it became a fairly different beer. It had been good without age and just as good, but different, with age. If you enjoy the taste then it's ready to drink. If you don't, then let it sit. If you enjoy it now, but might enjoy it more later, just pick one. Either way, when other's tell you "You're doing it wrong," remember whose beer it is and whom it has to please--you and...um...you. It's not possible to make hard fast rules about much in life--this applies especially to beer.

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Old 12-04-2012, 12:50 PM   #24
Oter
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I usually start drinking my beer at 14 days in the bottle. 90% of the time it's not any more carbed at 3 weeks than 2 and 90% of the time its delicious.

 
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Old 12-04-2012, 04:41 PM   #25
vlucchetti
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As the 70 degree seems to be a standard, can we extrapolate a length of time if you are not able to get your room/bottles up to 70 in the colder weather months?

If you condition at, say 62, are you adding x number of weeks to the process?

 
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Old 12-04-2012, 04:46 PM   #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vlucchetti View Post
As the 70 degree seems to be a standard, can we extrapolate a length of time if you are not able to get your room/bottles up to 70 in the colder weather months?

If you condition at, say 62, are you adding x number of weeks to the process?
There's too many other variables to give any "cut and dried" answer to this...It would be predicated for one thing in knowing how many weeks it would ACTUALLY be ready if at 70...

Basically, you try your beer, then try another in a week or two, until the beer is done....really just trial and error. Rather than three, try at 5, or six or whatever and see.
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Old 12-04-2012, 04:51 PM   #27
ajlee
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I agree, usually it gets even better with time, but all of my beers but one have been perfectly drinkable at three weeks (pumpkin needed more time to carb).

 
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Old 12-08-2012, 06:59 PM   #28
andycr
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My hefe (WLP300) was at its prime at 2 weeks, it's only gone downhill from there.

My pale ales and blonde ales (US-05) are almost always as good as they get at 2 weeks - though more time doesn't seem to hurt them, all the way up to a couple months.

I had a beer made with S-04 that was pretty bad until around a month in, at which point it started getting better and better.

I live in Arizona, so my conditioning temps are closer to 75, which may accelerate things somewhat. I believe it depends more on the yeast than any other factor.

 
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Old 12-10-2012, 02:22 AM   #29
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I agree with Oter. I start drinking at 14 days and find that there is no diff with extra warm conditioning time. Two weeks of additional cold conditioning time however does improve my ales. In addition I bottle most of my ales after 14 days in primary. Again, I have noticed no diff with extended primaries in 90% of my ales.
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Old 12-11-2012, 08:39 PM   #30
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What I've started doing recently, since I don't keg (yet) is put part of the batch in a tap-a-draft bottle and use that to force carbonate. This way I can start drinking usually in a week and by time that is done the rest is ready to put in the fridge.

 
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