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Old 08-28-2008, 08:08 PM   #1
ericd
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So it could just be that I had the last half of my bottle of old ruffian and I'm pretty drunk right now, but how about amylaze enzyme? It's an enzyme that converts starch to sugar, which would allow you to ferment any type of starch! So you could mash a bunch of fig newtons with the enzyme and you'd have fermentable wort! Or oatmeal cookies! 100% Fig Newton Beer! Imagine the possibilities! You could make beer out of those tasty baguettes from your street corner bakery or cake. Can you imagine how f*cking awesome chocolate cake beer would be???? I mean...holy sh*t!

Now, to figure out how to make proteins into something fermentable...so does anyone know where I can get some of this stuff? It's in beersmith's "misc" list but google isn't much help. Ok, I'll leave you guys in peace

 
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Old 08-28-2008, 09:03 PM   #2
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It's marketed under the name Beano. There are issues with using it though, because it doesn't stop working until you kill it. It'll literally turn wort into wine.
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Old 08-28-2008, 09:06 PM   #3
King of Cascade
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Wine makers use the stuff so any wine making store would have it. It's the same thing as beano so you could pick it up a CVS or Walgreens. I tried it with a few things using it during fermentation......1) barley wine - to much alcohol even after a few years. 2) IPA - won 1st place at the state fair 3) super high gravity barley wine - its still syrup.
Experiment with it and post your results, I think there is potential in using it in your mash if you can get the temp low enough because the enzyme is not heat tolerant.

 
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Old 08-28-2008, 09:09 PM   #4
Freezeblade
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Beano is a de-branching enzyme, and I hear the one that is used in much of malt liquor production and some "light" BMC. In the Grocery And Produce experiment, many of us looked to this instead of mashing in order to convert our starches. Although judging by many of the results, I wouldn't do it as the main source in anything other than a small test batch.
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Old 08-28-2008, 09:09 PM   #5
Brandon O
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ericd View Post
So it could just be that I had the last half of my bottle of old ruffian and I'm pretty drunk right now, but how about amylaze enzyme? It's an enzyme that converts starch to sugar, which would allow you to ferment any type of starch! So you could mash a bunch of fig newtons with the enzyme and you'd have fermentable wort! Or oatmeal cookies! 100% Fig Newton Beer! Imagine the possibilities! You could make beer out of those tasty baguettes from your street corner bakery or cake. Can you imagine how f*cking awesome chocolate cake beer would be???? I mean...holy sh*t!

Now, to figure out how to make proteins into something fermentable...so does anyone know where I can get some of this stuff? It's in beersmith's "misc" list but google isn't much help. Ok, I'll leave you guys in peace
Homebrew Connection sells it and it is cheap. I have some because it is used in a cream ale recipe. The recipe is in this section and the title is "What cherries would be best to use?"

 
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Old 08-28-2008, 09:27 PM   #6
ericd
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Beano isn't amylaze. It's alpha galactosidase which can only break down oligosaccharides (short chains of sugars, sort of like baby starches). Source: Beano (dietary supplement - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia)

 
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