Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Beginners Beer Brewing Forum > How to make a traditional Welsh Ale
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Old 04-14-2013, 07:31 AM   #11
badlee
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you could try drinking a Shropshire ale and then taking all of the taste away. That would leave you with an aproximation of the only Welsh beer I have ever had, and that's living next door to Wales for 2/3 of my life


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Old 05-06-2013, 04:22 AM   #12
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I have not brewed this yet, but hope to soon. I did learn a few things about brewing a period beer reciently that should really help:

- Kent Goldings are pretty much the only hop that was used in this period, but the potency has doubled due to selection over time. Because of this the hops need to be halved in any period recipe.

- The quality of the malt has also improved drastically. I have no hard numbers yet, but the ABV of a beer brewed with the same malt to liquid ratio will be higher.

- Marris Otter and brown malts are likely the closest approximations to the flavor profile of malts of that time.

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April 7, 2011 - Colonial Brewing
http://www.basicbrewing.com/index.ph...ing-radio-2011


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Old 05-06-2013, 04:35 AM   #13
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Hackwood:
Radical Brewing by Randy Mosher has a Welsh Ale Recipie predating the encyclopedia by 50 years. It includes molasses, pale malt, Kent goldings, and English Ale yeast. I don't know about copyright restrictions for posting that recipe, but it is on page 253 and the book has a bunch of great info. The book says prior to the 1800s Welsh Ale was a type of Bragot.

The book can be found on Amazon.
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Old 12-24-2013, 01:36 AM   #14
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I'm of Welsh decent myself so I'm a bit curious about this I recently got this book called Clone Brews. It has 200 commercial brewery clone recipes and one of them is Brains Brewery's Traditional Welsh Ale. This is pretty much the most popular beer in Wales and I first learned about it when I visited them this past summer.

The clone recipe uses cane sugar with Fuggles and East Kent Golding hops. The all grain version uses 7 lbs of 2 row and 8 oz of crystal malt. The recommended yeast is Wyeast 1028.

here is a link to the book:

http://www.amazon.com/CloneBrews-2nd...ds=clone+brews

I'm not sure if there is a copyright issue involved so I won't post the link but it appears the book is available on Google Books as well and the Brains recipe is shown in the samples pages.
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Old 01-09-2015, 11:19 PM   #15
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Re-re-reviving this thread. Schlafly just posted on Instagram that they are doing a Welsh Ale. And I have done some looking into this myself and came up with nada. I mean, all other countries in the UK have a beer style... So can anyone say what a Welsh style beer would consist of? Based on what I can gather about the Schlafly beer, it sounds like it might be something like the following formula:

English pale ale minus some maltiness plus more hoppy-ness.

Thoughts anybody?
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Old 01-10-2015, 04:26 AM   #16
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No
It would be a D-bomb,about 3.8%,under attenuated and under bittered. Devoid of hop flavour and aroma
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Old 01-10-2015, 04:39 AM   #17
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Wow. I checked "Shut Up About Barclay Perkins" since Ron Pattinson seems to be a reliable source for obscure and/or historic beer (particularly when from the British Isles) and even HE has no information on it outside of what you folks have already shared. http://barclayperkins.blogspot.com/s...elsh%20Ale?m=0

Now I too am curious.
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Old 01-10-2015, 09:02 PM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by badlee View Post
No
It would be a D-bomb,about 3.8%,under attenuated and under bittered. Devoid of hop flavour and aroma
What do you mean by D-bomb?
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Old 01-10-2015, 09:08 PM   #19
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The Welsh were distillers. They taught the Irish and the Irish taught the Scots, then the Scots and Irish brought it here. Beer brewing was likely a homecentric endeavor.

Off the cuff, I'd brew a pale mild and call it whatever you want.
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Old 01-11-2015, 02:47 AM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Weezy View Post
The Welsh were distillers. They taught the Irish and the Irish taught the Scots, then the Scots and Irish brought it here. Beer brewing was likely a homecentric endeavor.

Off the cuff, I'd brew a pale mild and call it whatever you want.
A pale mild. That sounds about right based on what I have seen. It's official then - Weish Ale is a pale version of a mild. CASE CLOSED


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