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Old 09-28-2011, 03:19 PM   #111
ForerunnerBrewer
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Yes. You'll want to sparge with hotter water (typically around 185) to bring the grain bed up to 170
One issue I have had with my fly sparge process is when I try to mash-out my 150˚grain bed with 185˚ water I can never get it up to 170˚. I read a post recently that inspired me to just stop worrying and add boiling water. Which I figured was ok if I quickly stirred it into the grain. Or during fly-sparging I had at least a few inches of water above the grain bed and the grain wasn't exposed to temperature that high for very long. It was still a bit hard to keep that water temp high enough because too much heat is disbursed out the top of my igloo mast tun.

Has anyone added boiling water with adverse effects? Because as we all know if grain gets too hot you'll get tannins.

p.s. I noticed some whole kernels in my milled grain from the hbs. I wanted those grains to be put to use so I double ground it! I modified my tun filter to have greater surface area and I consistently get 80+%


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Old 09-28-2011, 03:54 PM   #112
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I have added boiling water many times with no ill effects.


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Old 09-29-2011, 03:32 AM   #113
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That's great to know Denny, thanks!

One more thing. When I did this batch I was pretty fed up with my mash tun not keeping the temperature where I wanted so I mashed in a pot in the oven. I doughed in, did a protein rest for the heck of it and then brought it up to 153˚. My oven's lowest temperature is 170˚ so I pre-heated it, put the pot in and closed the door. The thermal mass of the mash would be enough to keep from heating up with the oven off.

I had to go to work for 3.5 hours and I figured it be fine if the temperatures slowly dropped over that time because the 150's would maintain for at least an hour. My question is after the temp is brought up to scarification, any idea if the lower temperature enzymes will activate on the temperature decline? Or would they be denatured by then?

This is a pale ale, I wonder what the textures and body will be like!
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Old 11-12-2011, 08:43 AM   #114
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Loads of knowledge here. I have to tuck away for future reading. Cheers
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Old 12-14-2011, 06:18 PM   #115
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Question on pre-boil gravity. Does the temperature of the Pre-boil effect the gravity and do you need to take that into account. I need with Original Gravity if you take it while it is still warm you have to account for that and change your gravity to based on temp.

The beer I just did (a rye pale) had a pre-boil gravity of 1.044 and my estimated gravity was much higher. My OG after my boil was less than estimated but not by as much. Is this just an efficiency problem or am I not taking temp into account correctly when measure my preboil gravity?
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Old 12-14-2011, 07:36 PM   #116
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As with all gravity readings you need to adjust for temperature. There are a number of resources / programs that will do the adjustment.
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Old 12-14-2011, 07:43 PM   #117
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For example - my hydrometer is calibrated for 60 degrees which means at 60*F the reading is exact. Outside of 60 degrees, the reading will be off and I need to adjust.

So for a 1.044 wort at 68*, the adjusted gravity is 1.045 (not a big difference), but for that same wort at 135* it's 1.059. In the case of pre-boil gravity, the runnings coming out of the mash and into the kettle are going to be pretty warm so you really need to figure out the adjusted gravity.

Knowing your correct pre-boil gravity (and pre-boil volume) is critical to the rest of the process in regards to hitting your targets. For example, if you know you typically boil off 1 gal / hr, you can easily figure out your expected OG and compensate with DME (to raise) or more water (to lower) if needed to hit your target. The gravity in the boil also affects the utilization of hops as well so hitting your targets allows you to replicate the recipe the way it was intended.
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Old 12-14-2011, 08:05 PM   #118
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First off thank you for the information, this makes me feel much better about my efficiency on this latest batch. my hydrometer is calibrated to 68, and the wort was around 140 my pre-boil reading was about 1.038 Temp corrected is 1.053 and my expect was 1.057.

My question now moves to my actual OG. I finished with 5 gal of wort into my primary. Took my initial Grav reading and got 1.052 temp corrected to 1.054 which is much lower then my expected OG. I feel like something must be wrong here. Any thoughts?
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Old 12-15-2011, 02:18 AM   #119
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So you're saying that your gravity readings (temp corrected) are 1.053 for your pre-boil gravity (4 points low) and your OG (aka after boil gravity) was 1.052? That doesn't seem to make a lot of sense to me. The boil should concentrate the wort, increasing the gravity significantly. The fact that your OG is lower than your pre-boil gravity doesn't make sense. A few things that are very important to think about here are:

- When taking a pre-boil gravity, it's important that all the runnings are well mixed. For example, the first runnings will be much higher than the final runnings.
- Make sure your equipment is working / calibrated properly (thermometer, hydrometer, etc.)

Not sure what's going on here to be honest.
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Old 12-15-2011, 06:45 PM   #120
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Quote:
Originally Posted by matalec1984 View Post
My question now moves to my actual OG. I finished with 5 gal of wort into my primary. Took my initial Grav reading and got 1.052 temp corrected to 1.054 which is much lower then my expected OG. I feel like something must be wrong here. Any thoughts?
Did you happen to do a partial boil and top off with water?


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