What are some classic German ales? - Home Brew Forums
Register Now For Free!

Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > General Beer Discussion > What are some classic German ales?

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 08-05-2008, 11:51 PM   #1
Beerbeque
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
 
Beerbeque's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Feb 2008
Sierra foothills CA
Posts: 511
Liked 28 Times on 21 Posts



When it comes to classic German beers, I can only think of lagers. Hmmm I guess they mostly like lagers just like the rest of the world- but do you know of any classic German ales?
Beerbeque

 
Reply With Quote
Old 08-06-2008, 12:06 AM   #2
eschatz
 
eschatz's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Dec 2007
Terre Haute, IN
Posts: 3,434
Liked 35 Times on 19 Posts


Wow, there's a whole freaking pile of them. Octoberfest, Marzan, Weisse,....
__________________
play the bass, brew the beer

What's tappening? :D

 
Reply With Quote
Old 08-06-2008, 12:08 AM   #3
eschatz
 
eschatz's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Dec 2007
Terre Haute, IN
Posts: 3,434
Liked 35 Times on 19 Posts


Dortmunder Export, Altbier, Hefe, Kristal, Kolsch, Sticke, Rauchbier,... I'm sure there's got to be more.
__________________
play the bass, brew the beer

What's tappening? :D

 
Reply With Quote
Old 08-06-2008, 12:09 AM   #4
xamers
 
xamers's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Apr 2008
Omaha to Japan
Posts: 165
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts


He's looking only for ales.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 08-06-2008, 12:11 AM   #5
Beerbeque
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
 
Beerbeque's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Feb 2008
Sierra foothills CA
Posts: 511
Liked 28 Times on 21 Posts


But Oktoberfest and Marzen are lagers.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 08-06-2008, 12:14 AM   #6
Beerbeque
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
 
Beerbeque's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Feb 2008
Sierra foothills CA
Posts: 511
Liked 28 Times on 21 Posts


And Dortmunder export is a lager too!

 
Reply With Quote
Old 08-06-2008, 12:15 AM   #7
John Beere
Deep Six Brewing Co.
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
 
John Beere's Avatar
Recipes 
 
May 2006
Valdosta, GA
Posts: 2,051
Liked 59 Times on 40 Posts


The funny thing about this forum is that when we are "on our game", there is a good chance we've also had a few too many - I think he maybe misread your question... heh

 
Reply With Quote
Old 08-06-2008, 01:12 AM   #8
chrisholst
Recipes 
 
Aug 2008
Harleysville, PA
Posts: 4

German ales are all kinda funky... Weizen, Gose, Berliner Weiss, and a raft of deprecated styles with crazy names like Peeterman. Germany settled on lager as its primary style... you've gotta be looking for something really out of the ordinary to be looking for a german ale...

 
Reply With Quote
Old 08-06-2008, 01:24 AM   #9
Revvy
Post Hoc Ergo Propter Hoc
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
 
Revvy's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Dec 2007
"Detroitish" Michigan
Posts: 40,921
Liked 3198 Times on 1886 Posts


I like you...you want to wander off the beaten path in your brewing...

Dusseddorf Altbier is one...here's an article on them http://www.suite101.com/article.cfm/...raveller/46320

ANd Michael Jackson's write up http://www.beerhunter.com/documents/19133-000838.html

I even found you a recipe....
Quote:
Altimate Nullifier (all grain)
4 lbs Cargill 2-row Pale
3 lbs Cargill europils
.5 lbs Cargill red wheat
2 lb mussedorfer munich
1.5 lbs Weyerman caramunich
0.1 lbs Bairds chololate

2 oz Tettnang (60 minutes)
1 oz tettnang (45 minutes)
1 oz saaz (30 minutes)
1 saaz (0 minutes)

SG: 1.056
IBUs: 52
abv: 6.2%


And I'm surprised that no one mentioned that old stand by Kolsch...

Here's some info from Wikipedia...
Quote:
German ales tend to be fermented at a somewhat lower temperature, and have more body than British or Belgian ales due to differences in mashing process; the traditional German decoction mash tends to create more oligosaccharides to provide body to the beer. The best-known varieties are Kölsch, a very pale ale from Cologne, and altbier (most associated with Düsseldorf but made in other parts of western Germany as well); wheat beers such as Hefeweizen and Berliner Weisse are also technically ales, though they may have different flavours, particularly the pronounced banana-like estery flavour of hefeweizen.
Here's a buch of different Kolsch recipes...http://www.bodensatz.com/staticpages...20510221215114

I've only had one beer, so I am relative pober

__________________
Like my snazzy new avatar? Get Sons of Zymurgy swag, here, and brew with the best.

Revvy's one of the cool reverends. He has a Harley and a t-shirt that says on the back "If you can read this, the bitch was Raptured. - Madman

I gotta tell ya, just between us girls, that Revvy is HOT. Very tall, gorgeous grey hair and a terrific smile. He's very good looking in person, with a charismatic personality... he drives like a ****ing maniac! - YooperBrew

 
Reply With Quote
Old 08-05-2009, 12:25 AM   #10
sonetlumiere85
Recipes 
 
Jan 2008
Posts: 389
Liked 5 Times on 5 Posts


Quote:
Originally Posted by chrisholst View Post
German ales are all kinda funky... Weizen, Gose, Berliner Weiss, and a raft of deprecated styles with crazy names like Peeterman. Germany settled on lager as its primary style... you've gotta be looking for something really out of the ordinary to be looking for a german ale...
Peetermann is from Louvain, but you're right about older styles of German ale being wheaty and weird (and ****ing awesome).

 
Reply With Quote
Reply
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
What Ales You IPA beerthirty Homebrew Ale Recipes 0 09-14-2008 10:46 PM
What makes a German a German? Joe Dragon Recipes/Ingredients 2 01-28-2008 07:28 PM
Classic. Orfy Drunken Ramblings and Mindless Mumbling 1 07-31-2007 08:11 PM


Forum Jump