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Old 08-07-2008, 07:13 PM   #11
drobbins
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I did a variation of you mounding soil over sidearms, here's a pic



this is referred to as "air layering"
it works good because the new plants continue to get support from the parent while they get going
the problem is the limited amount of sidearms you have low enough to do this
so I did a couple this way and a bunch more with cuttings
either way you end up with a plant in a pot that can then be moved with minimal disturbance of the root system
your comment on this being an experiment got me thinking
next spring I'll order a couple of rhizomes so I can compare how they perform next to these guys
should be interesting

Dave


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Old 08-07-2008, 08:03 PM   #12
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MY question is then, will these "soft wood" plantings continue to grow if you move them inside and keep them over winter? I think that they would do OK outside up until October and then have to move them inside to overwinter, but will they continue to grow inside and take over the home? All logic tells my they shouldn't, due to they being first year growth, right? Then if that is the case and they continue to grow through the winter will they still grow in season next spring through fall?

I have very healthy cascade and fuggles crops growing in my garden each at full potential with a ton of cones to be picked. I know that the "soft wood" cuttings will be hardy and grow well, I just dont want a jungle inside my home. Since I have found that Cascade to be a real producer I am going to strictly grow them and keep a few fuggles as they are heatlhy but produce less.

So back to the OG questions: will my hop growing inside become a jungle and will they grow overwinter and through the season next year?

-WW


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Old 08-07-2008, 08:12 PM   #13
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I plan to put mine in the ground this fall and let them overwinter there.
my guess would be if you brought them inside they would still go dormant due to the reduced hours of light but that is just a guess
of course my winters are a lot milder that for some of you folks
I guess nothing to do but try it and see how it goes
I'll be really surprised if it doesn't work well

Dave
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Old 08-07-2008, 09:40 PM   #14
The Soft Underbelly
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Dave, describe air layering a bit, i think i see what you did there, but i'm not sure i do.... yeah.... not sure i get it...... i like what i'm seeing though.
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Old 08-07-2008, 11:33 PM   #15
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air layering is taking a branch or shoot of a plant and sticking it into a pot of dirt while leaving it attached to the parent. it continues to get energy from the parent plant while it is establishing new roots. you usually scrape the outer layer of the stem off on the section that's going to be in the dirt and apply some rooting hormone (called girdling).
it's usually done with a baggy instead of a pot the way I did it in that picture, that way you're not tied to staying near the ground
try googling it and you'll get much better descriptions than I can give


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Old 08-10-2008, 02:16 PM   #16
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i think your description pretty much does it, that sounds like a great idea. i'll give that a shot nest season.
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Old 08-13-2008, 11:17 PM   #17
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I dug up and transplanted some of my rhizomes last fall (as the leaves were dying back).
The transplanted ones all came up in the spring, and I've started harvesting this week.


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