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Old 08-04-2008, 03:39 AM   #1
sjvicker
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Just brewed a stout, what psi should I set the nitrogen/co2 mix at to have it carbed within a week?

 
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Old 08-04-2008, 03:53 AM   #2
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Hook it back up to your CO2.
http://docs.northernbrewer.com/homeb...en_system.html

Quote:
Using the Nitrogen Kegging System


Method A –

This method assumes that you already have a separate CO2 cylinder and regulator. The beer is carbonated to a very low level with pure CO2, then dispensed at a high pressure using beer gas.
1. Cold-condition the beer for several weeks to maximize yeast flocculation; alternatively, use a fining such as gelatin or isinglass. This will help prevent the restrictor disc in the faucet from becoming clogged.
2. Rack the beer to the keg and chill to facilitate absorption of gas.
3. Force-carbonate the beer with CO2 only to approximately 2 vols of CO2. Refer to the following chart to find the correct regulator setting based on the temperature of your beer.
Temp 5 PSI 10 PSI 15 PSI 20 PSI 25 PSI 30 PSI 30 F 2.23 2.82



35 F 2.02 2.52 3.02


40 F 1.83 2.30 2.75 3.19

45 F 1.66 2.08 2.51 2.94

50 F 1.50 1.90 2.30 2.70 3.10
55 F
1.75 2.12 2.47 2.83 3.18 60 F
1.62 1.95 2.27 2.60 2.92
4.Disconnect the CO2 and relieve any pressure in the headspace of the keg.
5.Connect the nitrogen regulator/cylinder assembly to the keg. Back the adjusting screw on the regulator all the way out.
6.Connect the liquid line to the keg.
7.Open the valve on the cylinder to begin gas flow. Using the adjusting screw, set dispensing pressure to 25 psi; pour a sample and adjust dispensing pressure as necessary.

Method B -

Because the beer is not technically carbonated with this method, you can save time and skip some of the steps listed above. However, this method does require additional components that are not included with this system. If you use Method B to nitrogenize your beer, you will first need to attach a stainless steel diffusion stone to the gas-in dip tube of your keg (use about 2 feet of 1/4” ID tubing for a 5 gallon keg).
  1. Cold-condition the beer for several weeks to maximize yeast flocculation; alternatively, use a fining such as gelatin or isinglass. This will help prevent the restrictor disc in the faucet from becoming clogged.
  2. Keg the beer and chill to 35F.
  3. Connect the nitrogen regulator/cylinder assembly to the keg, open the valve on the cylinder and set the pressure to 15 psi. Allow keg to pressurize for one hour.
  4. Close the cylinder valve and relieve pressure in the headspace of the keg.
  5. Connect the liquid line to the keg.
  6. Open the cylinder valve. Using the adjusting screw, set dispensing pressure to 35 psi and pour a sample; adjust pressure as necessary.
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Old 08-05-2008, 03:49 AM   #3
sjvicker
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wow.... never expected such a well written how/to on homebrew nitrogen. Thanks for finding it.

 
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Old 08-05-2008, 04:52 AM   #4
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I've been considering using a beer gas/nitrogen mixture and have a few technical questions.

Does method A actually produce the "nitro" style head and creaminess? It seems that since the nitrogen wouldn't be readily absorbed into the beer, the only thing that it would be doing is pushing the beer out, not affecting the beer coming out of the tap. Am I incorrect in this assumption?

 
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Old 08-05-2008, 10:56 AM   #5
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I just hook up the beer gas to my nitrogen regulator and crank it up to 35 psi. I leave it there for 5 days. Done. I brew 10 gallons, so I use beer gas with one keg and C02 with the other.



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Old 08-05-2008, 01:40 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Laurel View Post
Does method A actually produce the "nitro" style head and creaminess? It seems that since the nitrogen wouldn't be readily absorbed into the beer, the only thing that it would be doing is pushing the beer out, not affecting the beer coming out of the tap.
My understanding is that the only thing you want the nitrogen doing is pushing the beer. It's the restrictor plate in the stout faucet forcing the co2 out of solution that creates the cascading creamy head. Of course, I've been wrong before

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Old 08-05-2008, 02:07 PM   #7
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So in order for a beer to get that "nitro" style, the beer needs to be force carbed by nitrogen and poured through a stout faucet?

 
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Old 08-05-2008, 03:04 PM   #8
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It is my understanding that it should be force carbed by CO2, and pushed with nitrogen. Nitrogen is not very soluble in beer, so it seems you would have to rely on CO2 for the initial carbonation.

Of course, I might be wrong. Mr. Wizard says otherwise.
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Old 08-05-2008, 03:30 PM   #9
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That was my understanding too. I was discussing it with hwmbo and we were unable to determine how the nitrogen affected the creaminess of the head then, unless it's just a function of the style of tap and the high pressure. In that case, cranking the PSI up to 40 or so for a few minutes for that "perfect pour" through a stout tap should work, no?

 
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Old 08-05-2008, 03:34 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Laurel View Post
That was my understanding too. I was discussing it with hwmbo and we were unable to determine how the nitrogen affected the creaminess of the head then, unless it's just a function of the style of tap and the high pressure. In that case, cranking the PSI up to 40 or so for a few minutes for that "perfect pour" through a stout tap should work, no?
If your beer has little body and little head persistance then the creamy effect will be short lived.

Yes that will work.

EDIT: But you should go lighter on the carbonation.
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