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Old 07-31-2008, 12:12 PM   #1
strangecarr
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Does anyone here not prime beer before bottling?

I ruined a batch recently by over-priming; I will bottle again at the weekend and will not add anything to the beer. I think the beer will still be carbonated.

Anyone got any thoughts on this?



 
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Old 07-31-2008, 12:13 PM   #2
Big10Seaner
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How much did you use for 5 gallons? It's pretty hard to over prime if you use 3/4 cup of corn sugar for 5 gallons. You're going to be very disappointed if you don't prime before bottling.


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Old 07-31-2008, 12:14 PM   #3
Bobby_M
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Why do you think it will still carb with no priming? If it does, it means it wasn't fermented all the way in the first place. You probably just rushed the beer into the bottles. How long did you leave it in the primary fermenter? If it's less than two weeks, you're in dangerous territory.
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Old 07-31-2008, 01:49 PM   #4
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Priming is something I've been giving some thought to lately. As a fan of styles indiginous to the British Isles it's important not to over carb. So far so good. For my ales I'm usually putting in a couple of tablespoons more than 1/2 cup to carb 5 gallons.

Here's some useful info:

http://byo.com/referenceguide/primingchart/

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Old 07-31-2008, 04:26 PM   #5
strangecarr
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Thanks for your replies. I left the beer in primary for 10 days.

My thinking was this, the beer has CO2 dissolved in it and there is probably some sugar left in the beer that the yeast will ferment to create some more. Also I thought that the action of bottling will agitate the already dissolved CO2 to come out of solution causing a vapor pressure inside the bottle.

Whenever I take hydrometer readings in the trial jar, the beer always looks carbonated.

 
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Old 07-31-2008, 04:40 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by strangecarr View Post
Thanks for your replies. I left the beer in primary for 10 days.

My thinking was this, the beer has CO2 dissolved in it and there is probably some sugar left in the beer that the yeast will ferment to create some more. Also I thought that the action of bottling will agitate the already dissolved CO2 to come out of solution causing a vapor pressure inside the bottle.

Whenever I take hydrometer readings in the trial jar, the beer always looks carbonated.
Well, yes, the beer appears carbonated, especially if it's kept cool in the fermenter. That's why there are priming charts telling you to add less sugar if the beer is under 60 degrees. CO2 tends to remain in solution when the solution is colder.

I think you'll have very flat beer if you don't prime. If the beer is finished (as proven by FG readings) and the yeast have eaten all of the fermentables, the shouldn't be any available sugar for them to ferment. Racking will cause some of the co2 already dissolved in there to come out of solution, as well.

If your beer was overcarbonated last time, either you didn't wait until fermentation finished, or you added too much priming sugar. No other possibilities at all.


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