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Old 06-20-2008, 06:04 PM   #1
kjung
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I have done a couple of threads on this before, but I am almost to the point of desperation now.
About a month ago, I brewed my very first high gravity beer, a Saison. After three weeks in the primary, the gravity had stalled to 1.050, after starting at 1.130. The target F.G. is around 1.016. After receiving some bad info, i tried warming up the primary, and may have damaged the original yeast.
I contacted White Labs, and the suggested either transferring everything to another primary, to rouse the yeast, or adding another yeast.
Well, an already long story short, I have done both in the last few days, and still am nowhere near the target final gravity, having dropped MAYBE .002.

Should I just let it sit for a few more days, and then rack it to the secondary, call it a loss,??? ... I have tasted it, and it is good, but kind of thick and syrupy.



 
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Old 06-20-2008, 06:07 PM   #2
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When you repitched, did you make starter? I don't think warming up the fermenter would have damaged the yeast, saisons can ferment quite warm. What is the recipe? Your OG is quite high, do you have a lot of unfermentables in there?


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Old 06-20-2008, 06:09 PM   #3
kjung
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Professor Frink View Post
When you repitched, did you make starter? I don't think warming up the fermenter would have damaged the yeast, saisons can ferment quite warm. What is the recipe? Your OG is quite high, do you have a lot of unfermentables in there?
I used a starter I made a couple of days before I pitched it. The recipe had 13.5 lbs. of DME, along with a couple of lbs. of grain, so there is PLENTY of fermentables in there.

 
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Old 06-20-2008, 06:17 PM   #4
Drunkensatyr
 
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What brand DME? not all DME is equal.

 
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Old 06-20-2008, 06:21 PM   #5
kjung
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Drunkensatyr View Post
What brand DME? not all DME is equal.
I believe it was Briess. It MIGHT have been Munton's, but I don't think so.

 
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Old 06-20-2008, 06:25 PM   #6
kjung
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I should probably also add, before anybody asks, that my original yeast was White Labs Saison 565, and the second yeast was their California Ale 001

 
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Old 06-20-2008, 06:42 PM   #7
Drunkensatyr
 
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well, that should have attenuated more. 70-75 is the perfect temp for that strain. You are over 10% ABV right now though, and I do not know the tolerance off the top of my head for that strain.

 
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Old 06-20-2008, 06:48 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Drunkensatyr View Post
well, that should have attenuated more. 70-75 is the perfect temp for that strain. You are over 10% ABV right now though, and I do not know the tolerance off the top of my head for that strain.

That is what I am worried about. I had it sitting at 85-90 for a good week with the original yeast. It was at around 70 after that, though, including after I pitched the second yeast. That is why I can't understand not getting any fermentation now !

 
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Old 06-20-2008, 06:55 PM   #9
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Yea I think your alcohol maybe a little high for either of the yeasts you pitched. you could use a champaign yeast but that might dry it out too much, maybe a different belgian yeast specifically for beers around 15% alcohol. in any case I would expect the fermentation to take a lot longer than a normal beer and when its done it will need to age for a long time I think.

 
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Old 06-20-2008, 06:59 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by k1v1116 View Post
Yea I think your alcohol maybe a little high for either of the yeasts you pitched. you could use a champaign yeast but that might dry it out too much, maybe a different belgian yeast specifically for beers around 15% alcohol. in any case I would expect the fermentation to take a lot longer than a normal beer and when its done it will need to age for a long time I think.
I am anticipating a long aging time. I don't expect to bottle it before the beginnig of October, at the earliest.
I really don't want to pitch a THIRD yeast. I'm afraid of what that might do to the final taste.



 
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