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Old 03-06-2006, 03:53 AM   #1
MrEcted1
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Well, I made my first batch of brew today (busta nut brown ale). Everything seemed to go pretty well, i'm pretty confident. There is one little issue though...

I cooled my wort really quick, in fact I cooled it a bit much I think. The wort was at about 62 degrees and I went ahead and pitched the yeast anyways figuring that once the brew warms up a bit my yeast can go to town.

Is this a potential problem? I didn't think about it at the time, but now that I think about it... I am worried that there might be a problem because the yeast need the oxygen from the aeration and at this point there is only about 1/2 inch of head in my primary (this is about 4 hours after putting the brew in my primary). is 62 degrees too cold for the yeast to become active?

Thanks!



 
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Old 03-06-2006, 03:58 AM   #2
MrEcted1
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One other thing...

I couldn't get the wort to boil fully... it was between a simmer and a boil, like an aggressive simmer that wanted to boil but didn't quite make it (I couldn't get my stove any hotter!). Is this an issue?

Thanks (and I apologize for worrying too much)



 
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Old 03-06-2006, 08:27 AM   #3
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Fist question first; How much yeast did you pitch? Liquid or dry? I would expect your fermentation to go okay, not the optimal, but it should be alright. With out enough warmth your yeast may not have mutiplied as much as you'd like. Try not to stress your yeast too much any more (don't let the wort cool down too much or temperature fluctuate too much).
How did you aerate your wort? Do you have any bubbles in your airlock yet?

The next question. Were you doing a full volume boil? A nice rolling boil results in better beer (so they say).

Don't worry too much. You will likely make beer, and then you get to drink it.
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Old 03-06-2006, 01:28 PM   #4
Mikey
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Your beer will be fine, nothing you did is critical.

 
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Old 03-06-2006, 01:56 PM   #5
MrEcted1
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Quote:
Originally Posted by catfish
Fist question first; How much yeast did you pitch? Liquid or dry? I would expect your fermentation to go okay, not the optimal, but it should be alright. With out enough warmth your yeast may not have mutiplied as much as you'd like. Try not to stress your yeast too much any more (don't let the wort cool down too much or temperature fluctuate too much).
How did you aerate your wort? Do you have any bubbles in your airlock yet?

The next question. Were you doing a full volume boil? A nice rolling boil results in better beer (so they say).

Don't worry too much. You will likely make beer, and then you get to drink it.

I pitched a vile of white labs english ale (liquid)

I aerated the wort by aggressively pouring the wort into the carboy (through a funnel of coarse) and then I shook the living crap out of the carboy until it had a good bit of head on it (shook it for about 4 minutes very aggressively... my back hurts now! =)

I was doing a partial boil... which is part of the reason I accidently brought it down a little too cold. I gave it an ice bath and then poured in cold the cold water and it got a bit too cold.

The airlock is only bubbling about once every minute or so, but at this point its been fermenting for about 12 hours.

 
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Old 03-06-2006, 02:08 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MrEcted1
I was doing a partial boil... which is part of the reason I accidently brought it down a little too cold. I gave it an ice bath and then poured in cold the cold water and it got a bit too cold.

The airlock is only bubbling about once every minute or so, but at this point its been fermenting for about 12 hours.
Sounds like you'll be fine. For partial boils, chilling the wort down to about 90 is usually a good target, depending on how cold your top-off water is. That's also a good target temp for avoiding off flavors from hot side aeration of your wort.

It seems strange that you had trouble maintaining a full boil with a partial boil. I do partial boils on a crappy old stove and am more likely to have the opposite problem (boilovers). I guess if it's a lower-end gas range, maybe.
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Old 03-06-2006, 02:28 PM   #7
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Are you boiling on an electric stove? If so you may be able to find a higher heat element.

You sound like you're good with the ferment. Hopefully the bubbling will pick up speed, but your aeration and temp sound fine.
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Old 03-06-2006, 02:43 PM   #8
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You seem to be on the right track.I brewed a Kolsch ale and the recipe called for fermenting at 60 degrees. It just took a lot longer. As the beer warms up it will ferment faster. I never heard of a high end range being any hotter than a low end range. If you continue to have problems you can always buy a propane cooker. I paid $39 for a turkey frier and that came equiped with a cooker, regulator and a 71/2 gal pot. The propane tank is extra.
Good Luckl

 
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Old 03-06-2006, 02:51 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by davidkrau
I never heard of a high end range being any hotter than a low end range.
In gas ranges, that's the main thing you're paying more for in higher-end models: higher BTU burners. In electrics, I don't think there's much difference in the BTU ratings of the burners.
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Old 03-06-2006, 03:09 PM   #10
MrEcted1
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Thanks for all the input!

My gas stove really sucks... Sometimes getting a full pot of water to boil takes a bit longer then it should... I had a heck of a time getting this to boil much at all... I only had 1 1/2 gallons of water in there!

I will probably be buying a turkey fryer like david suggested...



 
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