Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Beginners Beer Brewing Forum > Anyone got a picture of a 6.5 gallon carboy with 5 gallons in it?
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Old 04-11-2008, 04:53 AM   #11
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Let it be... nothing wrong with coming up a little short, and that's actually not that low. I would definately not add water though. Think about it, would you add water to a glass of beer, basically the same thing. You shouldn't have any problems, just a couple fewer bottles. RDWHAHB and next time, make the batch a little bigger.


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Old 04-11-2008, 05:03 AM   #12
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I was taught at first to only do primary and not transfer into secondary. Seems like a lot of people do that now. I was told to leave my water about a gallon short on a 6 gallon batch to allow room for the foam, and then add more water once it has gone down. Worked fine, but makes it hard to test.
Did you test the gravity before you pitched the yeast, and was it close to what you were shooting for?
Even without testing, if it called for 5 gallons and you are short, i wouldn't worry about adding a little more water once the primamry fermantation has slowed down. Wait until it has done its thing first.


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Old 04-11-2008, 05:39 AM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by violins
I was taught at first to only do primary and not transfer into secondary. Seems like a lot of people do that now. I was told to leave my water about a gallon short on a 6 gallon batch to allow room for the foam, and then add more water once it has gone down. Worked fine, but makes it hard to test.
Did you test the gravity before you pitched the yeast, and was it close to what you were shooting for?
Even without testing, if it called for 5 gallons and you are short, i wouldn't worry about adding a little more water once the primamry fermantation has slowed down. Wait until it has done its thing first.
This is just asking for problems, namely, oxygenation. Adding water to an already fermented beer risks adding oxygen which is one of the worst things for your beer after fermentation (the yeast have already used what they need). This will lead to unstable storing and your beers going bad possibly even before you ever bottle them, and almost guaranteing that they wont be able to last as long on the shelf. You can get off-flavors like wet carboard very easily if proper care is not taken to avoid oxygenating your beer. Waiting until it has "done its thing" and adding water may end up being very detrimental to your brew. If you want to water your beer down go ahead, I just would never recomend it.

Other reasons not to water down you beer...

1. Lower ABV%
2. Unable to accurately calculate OG, IBU, SRM(color), ABV, etc.
3. Flavor is less pronounced, not quite what you wanted it to be.
4. Less malty/bitter
5. Tastes like BMC
6. You are watering down a perfectly good beer.
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Old 04-11-2008, 03:40 PM   #14
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Alright, I'm sold, no water.

I tend to like stronger beers anyway. I ended up with 45 bottles last time, let's see how many I get this time.

Does that look like 4.5 gallons?
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Old 04-11-2008, 03:56 PM   #15
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Good points. I'm new at this, and sometimes forget to RDWHAHB!
Since the yield will be low, you have a good excuse to get started on the next batch right away to make up for it!
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Old 04-11-2008, 05:08 PM   #16
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Also, could depend on what kind of carboy you have. I have one carboy that's skinny, but 2-3 inches taller than my others of the same capacity.
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Old 04-11-2008, 05:22 PM   #17
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I think the top of the Krausen is about 5 gallons..so my estimate would be u are right at 4 gallons maybe a bit over around 4.25 gallons at most..

I also agree unless your gravity is way off or way high and u don't want such a big beer u can go with more water..but I would never do that myself and just say I made a bigger beer and be happy..

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Old 04-11-2008, 06:02 PM   #18
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4? Crap, I have no idea how I could have lost that much water... at least I know what to do next time to correct this.

I should still walk away with over 40 bottles.... at least my kit was cheap.
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Old 04-11-2008, 07:16 PM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Brew Dude
4? Crap, I have no idea how I could have lost that much water... at least I know what to do next time to correct this.

I should still walk away with over 40 bottles.... at least my kit was cheap.

No worries we all have either had too little or too much..I personally would rather have too little of a great beer than too much of a watered down beer.

What was your process and maybe we can help..I do all grain full boils and have 7.0 to 7.25 gallons pre boil(60 min boil) and end up with 5.5 into fermenter as some have said. My boil off rate is at about 15% on most days..Have u checked your boil off rate? It really can very on windy or cold days.. I measered up to 9 gallons with one of my spoons in my kettle so I can check my volume exactly before I boil and adjust my time accordingly. software helps as well. I have done the same process with all of my batches and had it vary almost 1/2 gallon depending on the conditions and intensity of the boil.

Jay
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Old 04-11-2008, 08:43 PM   #20
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I'm still an extract brewer while I collect my all grain equipment arsenal.

The recipe called for steeping grains for 25 minutes in 3 quarts of 155 degree water. Then, sparge with 3 more quarts of 170 degree water (I sparged more than this because I noticed my runnings were still dark. I probably sparged with almost a gallon.

I then brought 2 gallons of water to a boil, turned off the heat, stirred in my extract, and then added the grain water. So, at this point I should have had almost 4 gallons. (~7 quarts steep water + 2 gallons boil water). After adding the hops I began the hour long boil. No lid, so I did lose water during this process. After I chilled the wort down to pitching temperature, I added about 1.5 gallons to my carboy before adding the wort. I brought it into my garage, pitched the yeast, and it was fermenting aggressively around 12 hours later.

So, a little less than 4 gallons + 1.5 gallons should have given me around 5.5 gallons of water total. I probably lost no more than 0.5 gallons due to evaporation. I should of been right around 5 gallons, I just don't see how I could be off so much.


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