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Old 12-18-2008, 09:10 AM   #11
Piotr
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Originally Posted by BierMuncher View Post
(Well within the safe window of preventing oxidation).
What do you mean by this oxidation...window?
How long is too long?


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Old 12-14-2009, 10:23 PM   #12
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What do you mean by this oxidation...window?
How long is too long?
bump since I'd like to see the answer to this question.


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Old 12-17-2009, 04:39 PM   #13
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What do you mean by this oxidation...window?
How long is too long?

Yes I'd like to have this clarified too.
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Old 12-17-2009, 04:59 PM   #14
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Yes I'd like to have this clarified too.
Upstream (prior to pitching yeast) oxygen exposure has been over-hyped and shown to not be a problem in practice. This includes hot side aeration.

In fact, some argue that upstream oxidation is actually beneficial to beer flavor stability because the oxidized compounds are created earlier (rather than later) and removed as part of the hot/cold break and any remaining compounds are consumed by the yeast.

Consider Budweiser - they force sterile air through the wort after the boil is complete to remove undesirable volatile compounds (e.g., DMS, SMM, etc.). Clearly, this creates oxidation.

You should only worry about downstream (after the yeast is pitched) oxygen exposure to ensure good long term beer flavor stability.
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Old 12-17-2009, 05:07 PM   #15
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Originally Posted by lamarguy View Post
Upstream (prior to pitching yeast) oxygen exposure has been over-hyped and shown to not be a problem in practice. This includes hot side aeration.

In fact, some argue that upstream oxidation is actually beneficial to beer flavor stability because the oxidized compounds are created earlier (rather than later) and removed as part of the hot/cold break and any remaining compounds are consumed by the yeast.

Consider Budweiser - they force sterile air through the wort after the boil is complete to remove undesirable volatile compounds (e.g., DMS, SMM, etc.). Clearly, this creates oxidation.

You should only worry about downstream (after the yeast is pitched) oxygen exposure to ensure good long term beer flavor stability.

See that's what I was told that I should only worry after.
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Old 06-16-2010, 10:31 PM   #16
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i know i am pulling this from the graveyard, but i wanted to thank you for your recomendation.

I have been having an issue where beers wont come down far enough and i believe that this may be from having too many unfermentable sugars. I cant wait to try this out and am hoping that it makes a difference in my brewing.
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Old 06-17-2010, 04:47 AM   #17
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I'll go ahead and comment since you woke it from the dead.

I haven't seen attenuation much beyond what the manufacture advertises, but I'm always on the high side of that figure or maybe 1-3% higher. I usually do longer mashes. I was doing step mashes on almost every brew and would start the clock on the rest once i reached the temp, which I didn't realize at the time was extending my mash. I did a few single infusion mashes and got poor efficiency, but decent attenuation. It didn't dawn on me right away that it was longer mash times giving me the extra points in efficiency. What made me realize what was going on was doing an iodine test after a few batches that I had very poor efficiency on. I do this on every batch now as well as check pH at about 15 minutes into the mash.
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Old 05-04-2013, 10:30 PM   #18
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These old threads are priceless.
I just ran a 6 lb grain mash to produce 3 gallons of beer.
Decided to experiment, so along with the dregs of misc. grain around the house for a total grain bill under 7 lb and 4 oz of molassas and 2 oz DME, I hit a 1.05 OG
This way
1 hour 153 degree F mash followed by a trickle wort transfer to my boil pot of another 60 min. 2.5 gallons of water to start with.
A secondary mash out of 159 degree F with roughly 1.5 gallons of water for 60 min and another trickle transfer followed by a 75 min boil.

I used a washed S-04. Its been in the 3 gal carboy for 6 days and Im betting it gets really dry.
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Old 05-07-2013, 06:35 PM   #19
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These old threads are priceless...
Who you calling old???
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Old 05-08-2013, 04:54 AM   #20
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I'm glad this got re-necro'd. I was always finishing up a little higher than expected, but I had just assumed it was because I wasn't using a yeast starter. While I am going to start using a starter, I will also keep the thoughts here earmarked in my brain as I slowly work on nailing down my methods.


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