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Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing > Decoction Mash Video
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Old 11-08-2008, 03:50 PM   #81
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Originally Posted by Piotr View Post
I heard different explanation - in thick mash b-amylase survives longer, so it can longer do the starch-cutting job.
That's true, but I take it to more apply to a Protein rest (or acid rest). In other words, if you're doing a Protein rest, a thick mash will help more heat-labile enzymes to "survive" into the saccharification rest. This also explains why it's good (when doing a Protein rest) to start thick and gradually thin the mash as you increase rest temps for a more attenuable wort.

But in general, a thinner mash increases the proportion of maltose (to dextrins) and gives a higher attenuation potential.


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Old 11-08-2008, 04:16 PM   #82
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Quote:
Originally Posted by menschmaschine View Post
That's true, but I take it to more apply to a Protein rest (or acid rest). In other words, if you're doing a Protein rest, a thick mash will help more heat-labile enzymes to "survive" into the saccharification rest.
It is a shame that I can't find any data about the lenght of life of enzymes in varius temperatures. The only information is that drawing, I've found in a brewing book: (s**t, I don't know how to attach pictures here...)

Anyway, it says in 45*-50*C b-amylase lives forever, in 57*C ~2 hours, in 63C - 1 hour, in 70*C - 3-5 min (all that in a very thin mash).

So the protein-rest temperatures are no danger for enzymes.


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Old 11-08-2008, 04:18 PM   #83
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Cool Video!!

New to all grain brewing.

I thought it was a bad idea to boil grains?
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Old 11-08-2008, 04:26 PM   #84
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Piotr View Post
It is a shame that I can't find any data about the lenght of life of enzymes in varius temperatures. The only information is that drawing, I've found in a brewing book: (s**t, I don't know how to attach pictures here...)

Anyway, it says in 45*-50*C b-amylase lives forever, in 57*C ~2 hours, in 63C - 1 hour, in 70*C - 3-5 min (all that in a very thin mash).

So the protein-rest temperatures are no danger for enzymes.
There's another thread about this on here and John Palmer (How To Brew) describes it best:
Quote:
The grist/water ratio is another factor influencing the performance of the mash. A thinner mash of >2 quarts of water per pound of grain dilutes the relative concentration of the enzymes, slowing the conversion, but ultimately leads to a more fermentable mash because the enzymes are not inhibited by a high concentration of sugars. A stiff mash of <1.25 quarts of water per pound is better for protein breakdown, and results in a faster overall starch conversion, but the resultant sugars are less fermentable and will result in a sweeter, maltier beer. A thicker mash is more gentle to the enzymes because of the lower heat capacity of grain compared to water. A thick mash is better for multirest mashes because the enzymes are not denatured as quickly by a rise in temperature.
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Old 11-08-2008, 04:54 PM   #85
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+1 on thinner mashes...I used to do 1qt/lbs but man that is more trouble than it's worth! Now I do around 1.6qts/lbs and I get great conversion (85% efficiency) and even without mash-out lautering is never a problem.
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Old 11-08-2008, 05:39 PM   #86
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Hey thanks so much for this Kaiser! Mods, can you make this a sticky?
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Old 11-08-2008, 05:42 PM   #87
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mustangj View Post
Cool Video!!

New to all grain brewing.

I thought it was a bad idea to boil grains?
This has been talked about a lot. It's fine to boil grains in a decoction. Greg Noonan says:
Quote:
...because the density and pH of the decoction prevents phenols from being leached out of the husks.
So, you won't extract tannins like you would if you got a lot of grains in your boil after sparging.
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Old 11-08-2008, 06:14 PM   #88
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thanks for the info.

Unfortinaly Boiling and grains come up a lot when doing a search.
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Old 11-08-2008, 06:26 PM   #89
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mustangj View Post
thanks for the info.

Unfortinaly Boiling and grains come up a lot when doing a search.
Also as explained in the video, by boiling a thick decoction (mostly grain) after the mash sits long enough to disolve most of the enzymes the enzymes are not denatured, they are left in solution in the un-boiled liquor.
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Old 11-09-2008, 12:28 AM   #90
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Today's brew. This is how I do a decoction. First I find a friend who is willing to stir the decoction...........hehe........nice vids kai.



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