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Old 03-07-2008, 12:47 AM   #1
gmay10
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Default Lager and fermentation

I am currently brewing my second batch of lager. I started it at room temperature. I saw krausen starting to form so I put in the garage at 50 degrees. It has been there for 2 days yet no bubbles are being shown in the air lock. I peaked in today and saw that the krausen is probably 3-4 inches above brew. Should I be concerned about this? I know lager takes a while- is this normal? Thanks for any info.
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Old 03-07-2008, 02:50 AM   #2
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Yes lagers take longer. They are fermenting at cooler temperatures then ales so that slows them down. Additionally the colder the beer the more CO2 that can dissolve in it - by a large amount - so it takes longer to saturate the beer before it starts to bubble off.

I pitch in the low 40's and warm up to 52 over several days and won't see anything but a few little islands of foam for the first 48hrs then a krausen forms over the next 24-48 hours. I let them ferment 4 weeks before crash chilling, add gelatin to clear it for 5-7 days and then keg or bottle.

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Old 03-07-2008, 01:38 PM   #3
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If it wasn't fermenting, there wouldn't be a krausen. With that large a krausen, I suspect a leak somewhere.
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Old 03-07-2008, 01:43 PM   #4
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Absolute + 1 David. That is patently impossible. Seal that bitty up.
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Old 03-08-2008, 04:31 PM   #5
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Thank you for the responses. I will check to make sure there is a leak somewhere- It is a Pail ale bucket but I guess they makes mistakes too.
Anyway, I have another few questions:
#1 I was told to ferment the lager at 50 degrees for 2-3 weeks, which I did. Then I put it into a secondary fermenter and put that in the fridge for 3-4 weeks. I just talked with someone and they said that I should have bottled it as opposed to putting it into a secondary and refridging it. That is questions one- was this done correctly or does it depend who you talk to?

#2 I am now ready to bottle in a few days. The lager is currently in a fridge at 35 degrees, can the lager go into the bottles and then be put at room temperature in order for it to carbonate or do I need to keep it in the fridge so it is not skunked. I haven't read this anywhere on how to bottle lager if it is already at 35 degrees.

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Old 03-08-2008, 11:34 PM   #6
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I've concluded through a search that racking to a secondary or bottles is a personal preference. It sounds like your fine. Some folks simply like to keep fermenters free in order to continue moving forward and brewing. Their thirsty folks!

You musy allow your brew to naturally carb in the bottle at room temp for 2 weeks or around there. I'm thinking room temp here in south FL might be to hot for my upcoming lager thus I will condition for less time or construct a temp controlled carbonating box. After nat. carb. store your brews in a cooler than room temp place and no light of course (skunked beer from light I believe). Then transfer to frigde upon drinking. No worries, cheers!


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