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Old 02-25-2008, 03:29 PM   #1
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Default I broke down and did it...

So I did it, I couldn't wait.

After reading up and asking questions, I said screw it and went and bought a kit from New England Cheesemaking (the Cheese Queen).

Hopefully I will get it and be making cheese by this weekend!!!

I still don't know how to tell the difference between Pasteurized and Ultra P, so the first go round might not be good.
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Old 02-26-2008, 03:02 AM   #2
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I think I'm close to breaking down and doing the same. The mozzarella thread may have done it for me.
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Old 02-26-2008, 03:26 AM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jezter6
So I did it, I couldn't wait.

After reading up and asking questions, I said screw it and went and bought a kit from New England Cheesemaking (the Cheese Queen).

Hopefully I will get it and be making cheese by this weekend!!!

I still don't know how to tell the difference between Pasteurized and Ultra P, so the first go round might not be good.
I bought some cream the other day and it all said Ultra Pasturized, so maybe the milk will too. I googled my head off but got no definitave answer, it may be that they do not have to label it ultra but many still do, you can also look at the freshness date if its more than a week or tow its most likely ultra
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Old 02-26-2008, 03:33 AM   #4
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FWIW: From wikipeida http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pasteurization

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Pasteurisation typically uses temperatures below boiling since at temperatures above the boiling point for milk, casein micelles will irreversibly aggregate (or "curdle"). There are two main types of pasteurisation used today: high temperature/short time (HTST) and Extended Shelf Life (ESL) treatment. Ultra-high temperature (UHT, Also known as Ultra-heat treated) is also used for milk treatment. In the HTST process, milk is forced between metal plates or through pipes heated on the outside by hot water, and is heated to 71.7 C (161 F) for 15-20 seconds. UHT processing holds the milk at a temperature of 138 C (250 F) for a fraction of a second. ESL milk has a microbial filtration step and lower temperatures than HTST.[1] Milk simply labeled "pasteurised" is usually treated with the HTST method, whereas milk labeled "ultra-pasteurized" or simply "UHT" must be treated with the UHT method.
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Pasteurisation is typically associated with milk, first suggested by Franz von Soxhlet in 1886. HTST pasteurised milk typically has a refrigerated shelf life of two to three weeks, whereas ultra pasteurised milk can last much longer when refrigerated, sometimes two to three months. When UHT treatment is combined with sterile handling and container technology (such as aseptic packaging), it can even be stored unrefrigerated for 3-4 months.[
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Old 02-26-2008, 03:39 AM   #5
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Parmalat used to sell UHT milk (probably still do) on the shelf (unrefrigerated) in Mexico.
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Old 02-26-2008, 12:32 PM   #6
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I'm in contact with a few local dairies hoping that I can get milk in the raw from the farm. Maybe just roll up on saturday morning, pick up a gallon or two for cheese and come back next time I'm making a batch.

There's a number of local farmers that make/sell cheese for farmer's markets with their own milk, so at least if I can get some of that I can get some quality tested and proven milk.

That or I buy a farm and my own milk producers...
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Old 02-26-2008, 02:02 PM   #7
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Iirc, for cheese making I have heard that the ultra is better as the contact time is reduced. Albeit it's at a much higher temperature. Actually I think Caroll might talk about that in her book.

Remember with cheese it's all about the milk. Kind of like if you brewed your beer with chlorinated water. *blech*. Actually this is one of the things that stopped me from going further...although we are fortunate to have a local dairy that does not feed the cows hormones...etc. But I want raw milk and need to venture into Amish land to get some...either that or get some milk goats, but that's a commitment.
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Old 02-26-2008, 02:05 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jezter6
I'm in contact with a few local dairies hoping that I can get milk in the raw from the farm. Maybe just roll up on saturday morning, pick up a gallon or two for cheese and come back next time I'm making a batch.

There's a number of local farmers that make/sell cheese for farmer's markets with their own milk, so at least if I can get some of that I can get some quality tested and proven milk.

That or I buy a farm and my own milk producers...
Once you feel confident, I'd recommend doing as big a batch as you can manage. By the time you run out you'll realize "dang I should have made more"! Also, unless you have a really good way of controlling humidity, don't venture into the more complex ripened soft cheeses. Trust me on that . Actually I have been thinking of a modified food container for this, but I just haven't had the time to try it. I have these NSF rectangular containers I got at Sam's club for around $15 a pop. Clear Acrylic or something. Great containers. But I was thinking they might be ideal if you could make a mini rack system inside and then figure out how much water you'd need to keep in there to get the right humidity. A little 'Mickey Mouse' but it should work....
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Old 02-26-2008, 02:07 PM   #9
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As far as I've seen Ultra doesn't make curds and isn't good for cheese, but all the real info I find on ultra seems to be for cream, and not for milk. I've never seen anything that says ULTRA on a milk jug, but then again, I never looked too hard before.

I'll try with store milk once and if it sucks, I'll go dairy. In central PA, you should have no problem finding a local dairy. What part of Central are you from (pending where you live, I've seen people from Altoona to Lancaster all say they're in Central PA).
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Old 02-26-2008, 02:08 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by zoebisch01
Once you feel confident, I'd recommend doing as big a batch as you can manage. By the time you run out you'll realize "dang I should have made more"! Also, unless you have a really good way of controlling humidity, don't venture into the more complex ripened soft cheeses. Trust me on that .
Sounds like brewing...don't wait for the first batch to be done before you start making another.
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