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Old 02-13-2008, 04:07 AM   #1
Cos
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Default Mash temp vs body

What affects the body of the beer the most, the temperature of the mash-in or the length of the mash?

Beersmith shows
fully body as 158 deg. 45 min,
medium body 154 deg, 60 min.
light body 150 deg, 75 min.


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Old 02-13-2008, 04:11 AM   #2
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Temperature will affect it most. I think you could go 45 minutes or close to it at 150F.


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Old 02-13-2008, 06:13 AM   #3
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I just purchased Beersmith about a month or so ago and noticed just what you stated. Since I've been brewing. about 3 yrs. now, I was using a mach more on the low end of the temp and all those beers ended very dry (light) body and were very good. After getting Beersmith I tried my last 2 utilizing the 158F to try and get more body. This past weekend I racked my latest Scocttish stout and noticed that My fg apears to have been left at the higher end. OG 1.078 FG 1.020 My sample tasted likke it was going to have a lot more body than all my previous. So... guess I'd have to say that the temp was more of the determing factor body wise.
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Old 02-13-2008, 01:57 PM   #4
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I think the time is a function of the temperature. I.e., the lower the temp., the longer it takes the enzymes to convert the starches to sugars, be it beta or alpha amylase. So, in short, time (in itself) doesn't affect body near as much as temp. does.
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Old 02-13-2008, 02:34 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by menschmaschine
I think the time is a function of the temperature. I.e., the lower the temp., the longer it takes the enzymes to convert the starches to sugars, be it beta or alpha amylase. So, in short, time (in itself) doesn't affect body near as much as temp. does.
I think you're close. At the lower temps you will get more fermentable sugars and I think that is why the longer mash time is needed. But I could be wrong.
Never have I needed to go that long though. I will for the most part go with a 45 minute mash and a 10 minute mash-out. If I need a little more time I will go to 60 minutes and a 10 minute mash-out.

Do an Iodine check to know if you're done or not.
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Old 02-13-2008, 02:50 PM   #6
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The length of the mash is a requirement of temp (hotter converts faster) but you can't discount the crush. A finer crush will convert faster too because each starch partical is more readily exposed to the heat and the enzymes. All else being equal, a longer mash is the safer bet when you control fermentability with temp.
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Old 02-13-2008, 07:03 PM   #7
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http://byo.com/mrwizard/753.html

That ought to do it.
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Old 02-14-2008, 01:41 AM   #8
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First time poster (applause)

I just did a batch of a golden ale that I mashed at ~144F for 90 min. It's been in the primary for 2.5 weeks now. I overshot my planned OG by a bit due to a higher than expected efficiency. Started at 1.084 and is now 1.014 and still bubbling every 6 seconds or so. Point of this is it's quite dry already. First time I used a lower temp. Hopefully it will be good.
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Old 02-14-2008, 03:42 AM   #9
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Modern malts have alot of enzymes and convert quickly, even at lower temperatures. The best way to control your body is to be consistent in your mash process and then adjust temperature accordingly. I wouldn't adjust your mash time. Pick one - say 60 minutes - and always use that and then increase or decrease your mash temperature to dial in the fermentability you want. Even 2 degrees will result in a noticeable difference in your FG and the body of your beer.

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