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Old 04-08-2012, 06:38 PM   #21
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Did you add THREE yeasts?


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Old 04-08-2012, 08:18 PM   #22
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Did you add THREE yeasts?
No. I did the version that was in post #2, except I added in Nelson Sauvin hops at 15 min, and also put in 2lbs of brown sugar. Another change is that I went with the Wyeast 1728 Scottish Ale yeast (50ml starter) to accentuate the malt profile.

It turned out really well.

I'll probably brew it again next december - except I need to get through the case I have of it now, bottle conditioning.


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Old 04-08-2012, 09:12 PM   #23
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No. I did the version that was in post #2, except I added in Nelson Sauvin hops at 15 min, and also put in 2lbs of brown sugar. Another change is that I went with the Wyeast 1728 Scottish Ale yeast (50ml starter) to accentuate the malt profile.

It turned out really well.

I'll probably brew it again next december - except I need to get through the case I have of it now, bottle conditioning.
From everything I've read, this stuff will last forever. I'm planning on brewing this at least once a year and cellaring it. Then at some point I will do taste tests to compare how the flavour profile changes.
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Old 04-09-2012, 11:11 AM   #24
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Default Champagne Yeast

One caveate on using champagne yeast to prime: Its important that you use a higher mash temp to retain body in the beer if you plan to use champagne yeast to bottle condition the beer. I have been using it for not only barley wines but also big belgian ales. The champagne yeast is tenatious and will over time dry out the beers somewhat. So if you plan to lay them down for a long time you might consider paying close attention to your starting gravity, final gravity, and amount of priming sugar and estimated final alcohol percent in order to choose an appropriate yeast. I made a La Fin Du Monde clone 5 years ago for my wedding. I primed with champagne yeast and over the last five years, the ale went from spot on, to something more akin to champagne, very thin and over bubbly with no head retention.

On the other end of the spectrum, about three years or so ago, I made a belgian dubbel and my local home brew shop sold me what was supposed to be corn sugar, but was mis-labeled and it was maltose dextrine. I primed two batchs with it and needless to say they never carbonated properly. I reopened some bottles and reprimed with corn sugar. Still nothing, so I kept the batch for cooking. I opened a bottle the other day, some 3-4 years after I made them, and there was carbonation! Not a lot, but enough for a big beer. I guess the yeast had continued to work, albeit slowly and had carbonated it up nicely.

So the lessons are always taste white powdery stuff to make sure its what you think it is. And pay close attention to yeast alcohol tolerance, and beer changes alot over long term storage, not always to the good and not always to the bad.
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Old 04-09-2012, 12:06 PM   #25
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One caveate on using champagne yeast to prime: Its important that you use a higher mash temp to retain body in the beer if you plan to use champagne yeast to bottle condition the beer. I have been using it for not only barley wines but also big belgian ales. The champagne yeast is tenatious and will over time dry out the beers somewhat. So if you plan to lay them down for a long time you might consider paying close attention to your starting gravity, final gravity, and amount of priming sugar and estimated final alcohol percent in order to choose an appropriate yeast. I made a La Fin Du Monde clone 5 years ago for my wedding. I primed with champagne yeast and over the last five years, the ale went from spot on, to something more akin to champagne, very thin and over bubbly with no head retention.
I suspect something else may have been going on. The sugar left over after a beer yeast is done fermenting tends to be more complex sugars. Wine yeasts usually will only really ferment simple sugars. I suppose your La Fin Du Monde could have still had some simple sugars, though.
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Old 04-09-2012, 12:40 PM   #26
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Some wine yeast and I believe that Champagne yeast will kill off the beer yeast so there is no reason to pitch three yeasts. I would pick one of the three yeast and use that.

Not the best link but a start.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Killer_yeast
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Old 04-09-2012, 12:42 PM   #27
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From everything I've read, this stuff will last forever. I'm planning on brewing this at least once a year and cellaring it. Then at some point I will do taste tests to compare how the flavour profile changes.
It probably will... the thing is, I live in a relatively small apartment. Between the case of 1L bottles I'm cellaring from this, the 4 boxes of 22oz commercial bottles, the 16 or so 6-packs of 12 oz bottles, and the keggerator - I'm running out of space.

Hell, I even have a full keg of an American-style barleywine I did, sitting in the walk-in cooler at my friend's restaurant because I'm out of storage space.

I need to start trading homebrews.
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Old 04-11-2012, 06:07 PM   #28
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I wrote to the book's publisher about the recipe and here is what they said (I'm paraphrasing).

1. the first yeast is used for the original fermentation and to impart a nice yeast flavour.
2. after 3 weeks, pitch the champagne yeast to help finish up the fermentation.
3. 3 days before bottling, pitch the Windsor Ale yeast to ensure fermentation is complete and to help with carbonation.

I guess there are still two pieces of information missing.
1. how much time is there between steps 2 and 3?
2. how much of the Windsor Ale yeast do I need to pinch. The recipe says "a dose", but that isn't an official measurement that I have heard of so far.
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Old 04-11-2012, 06:57 PM   #29
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Thomas Hardy Ale is 11.90% ABV.

The Wyeast Scottish Ale yeast I used gets up to around 12% (and I'd probably use it again)

White Labs 099 can supposedly ferment up to 25% (a.k.a. the Thomas Hardy strain)
http://www.whitelabs.com/beer/strains_wlp099.html

I'm really not sure what the point is going through three different yeasts - at least not on a homebrewing scale.

Perhaps if you're trying to do this with a 60bbl fermentation tank - sure. I could see something maybe getting stuck somewhere.

But if you started with the right yeast, the right starter, and are brewing around 5gal, I can't see you needing to go through all of the sugar clean-up with the Champange yeast.
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Old 04-11-2012, 07:11 PM   #30
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I'm not claiming to be an authority here - feel free to use as many yeasts as you want.
I'm just personally not seeing the point.


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