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Old 12-15-2008, 05:36 PM   #41
robumba
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Dec 2008
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Wouldn't a person have to be insane to use propane indoors anyway, if with a CO2 detector? I mean, CO poisoning is one hazard, an explosion from a small propane leak is another.

I believe the summary is NO BURNING PROPANE INSIDE! EVEN WITH A CARBON MONOXIDE DETECTOR NEARBY!

 
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Old 12-31-2008, 03:28 AM   #42
jamesrm
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I just bought a CO detector that also measures uncombusted gas, which is great if you have a leak develop or anything along those lines, has a digital read out and was not that much more expensive than the CO only version at Lowes.

 
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Old 01-04-2009, 09:25 PM   #43
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Quote:
Originally Posted by robumba View Post
NO BURNING PROPANE INSIDE! EVEN WITH A CARBON MONOXIDE DETECTOR NEARBY!
I hear the concerns... I brew in an attached shed with a large gable exhaust fan running & open windows & doors as well a CO detector, but what about people who use propane kitchen stoves??? With 3 or 4 burners going why aren't you exposing yourself to the same dangers... in an enclosed space with only a hood vent running?

I'm just thinking that if you are careful to properly adjust your flame for clean burning and use proper ventilation, you should be OK
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Old 01-08-2009, 06:03 PM   #44
drayman86
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vtchuck View Post
I hear the concerns... I brew in an attached shed with a large gable exhaust fan running & open windows & doors as well a CO detector, but what about people who use propane kitchen stoves??? With 3 or 4 burners going why aren't you exposing yourself to the same dangers... in an enclosed space with only a hood vent running?

I'm just thinking that if you are careful to properly adjust your flame for clean burning and use proper ventilation, you should be OK
Maybe OK, maybe not.

The burners on kitchen ranges are manufactured to a higher quality than the typical propane turkey fryer burners a lot of us use on our systems, and therefore are much, much more efficient at completely combusting the propane. Remember, complete combustion of propane (or natural gas) yields only two byproducts: CO2 & H2O. Cast iron burners, especially those that are well used, a bit rusted, or slightly out of adjustment, will not burn the propane completely, hence the CO.

 
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Old 06-09-2009, 05:45 PM   #45
ggoodman
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I have known more than one fellow diver(including myself) who's dove bad gas from dive shop's compressors who's intake were to close to co and co2 emision sources. headache, blackout and or death are usually the result. Be safe.
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Old 01-13-2010, 04:28 AM   #46
Bdogg
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A bump,

Does anyone do this on a hi-rise balcony? It is a partially enclosed deal - about 14 feet long, 8 feet high, 5 feet wide, with a 3ft brick railing. So basically there is an opening that is 14 feet by 5 feet. I barbeque out there regularly but have never used it for an hour - and also, the emission source would only be about 10" off the ground in this case rather than 3 feet. Thoughts? I do not have a burner yet, but found one for sale today and was pondering it while I came across this thread.

 
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Old 01-25-2010, 07:13 PM   #47
C2H5OH
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What makes CO dangerous/poisonous, is the fact that hemoglobin has a higher binding affinity for CO than O2. The net effect of the CO binding leaves you suffocated/asphyxiated. The headache response is your brain "screaming" for O2 and if not treated,(removing yourself from the CO source) you subsequently will fall asleep and die.

*Don't try to heat your home with a gas oven/gas burners either.
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Old 03-08-2010, 04:12 PM   #48
EO74
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Im in construction and i do hvac.Most of the time in the winter the GCs will run open flame propane or diesel heaters and by the end of most of those days u can tell by the mind ripping headache and light headedness.I personally would never do this in a confined space but is just another construction hazard we deal with to pay the bills.Be safe USE A CARBONMONOXIDE DETECTOR and provide an adiquit supply of fresh air.

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Old 03-23-2010, 09:29 PM   #49
Monty420th
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I have always kept one of those monitors in multiple rooms in the house. I have never used anything but the range top to do mine so far so I know I am safe...but that monitor is no more than 5 feet away just in case (dioxide and monoxide monitor)
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Old 08-10-2010, 01:49 PM   #50
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This thread is very confusing. If I believe some then I can only brew outside no matter what. Others think you can brew in an enclosed basement if you do enough ventalation. I have recently switched to AG with propane which I can do outside until the weather turns to ZERO degrees here. Should I just not brew 3 to 4 months out of the year or is it conceivable that with a vent hood and a couple box fans positioned well enough can I try to pull it off in an enclosed basement? The last thing I want to do is endanger my wife and beagle when I could just go buy some beer.

 
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