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Old 01-25-2008, 12:50 AM   #1
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I have seen many threads about mashing temps and read the books, too, but they all seem to be very technical. There are a lot of us who have made FlyGuy's cooler MLT and do not step mash or do decoctions yet. What do you all mash at --beer specific. Stouts vs. Pale's and everywhere in between. Is there a general rule? I have always done the 154 rule, but if a few degrees makes a difference, why not? It would give me something new to do.

 
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Old 01-25-2008, 01:02 AM   #2
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154 is a good rule. If you like your brew sweeter, than a slightly higher temp, if you like your beer dryer than a lower temp. The temps are basicly to get you into a ball park for the different enzymes to do there work. What it boils down to is this, at a higher temperature sugars are being broken down, but not to fermentable sugars. so your beer tastes sweet after the ferment. At a lower temp. a different enzyme is at work breaking sugars down to fermentable tid bits. This makes your beer dryer and more alcoholic. That doesn't mean that the other enzymes are not at work, they are just not as active and the higher the temps get the more likely it is to denature the enzymes that work best in the lower ranges. So 154 is supposed to be the balance.

I am sure some of the others can explain it better, but that is the jist of it. S.
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Old 01-25-2008, 01:06 AM   #3
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For English Pale Ales (and related beers), I always mash at 153 - 154 degrees using 1 qt water per lb grain.
For English IPA's, I mash at 152 - 153, and still keep the ratio to 1 qt to 1 lb.
I am not very happy with my stouts, so I won't make any recommendation there.
My last brew was an American Pale Ale because some of the people who drink my beer think it has too much body (but it doesn't stop them drinking it). For that, I mashed at 150, using 1.25 qts per lb. It's still in primary, so I don't know how it's going to turn out.

-a.

 
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Old 01-25-2008, 04:41 AM   #4
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Cool and basic explanation, slnies, I like it!

So does the qt h20 vs. lb of grain also make a difference in body/malty vs. hoppy?

 
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Old 01-25-2008, 02:12 PM   #5
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Yes, that ratio does make a difference. Thicker mashes tend to make less fermentable wort and, thus, sweeter beers with more body. Thinner mashes tend to do the opposite.


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Old 01-25-2008, 02:16 PM   #6
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Yes. A thinner mash will give you a more fermentable wort than a thicker one. The differences in mash thickness are very subtle. Mash time can also affect this as well. A longer mash will produce a drier beer and also a higher efficiency. Though temp is the biggest deciding factor in all of this. Thickness and time will make more subtle differences than temp alone.
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Old 01-25-2008, 02:17 PM   #7
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Another thing to consider is the expected attenuation of your yeast. Mashing @ 154F for Nottingham is not going to yield the same results as mashing @ 154F for S-04...
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Old 01-25-2008, 05:08 PM   #8
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I brew up at around 156. I likes me malty brews.
Also mash at 2.61L/Kg
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Old 01-25-2008, 06:30 PM   #9
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This was good to see put so succinctly guys. THX!

 
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Old 01-25-2008, 07:42 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Soulive
Another thing to consider is the expected attenuation of your yeast. Mashing @ 154F for Nottingham is not going to yield the same results as mashing @ 154F for S-04...
Someone wanna explain this to me?

 
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