Beer tasting "dry" - Home Brew Forums
Register Now For Free!

Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Beginners Beer Brewing Forum > Beer tasting "dry"

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 07-22-2014, 09:11 PM   #1
Lemontato
 
Lemontato's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Jul 2014
Quebec, QC
Posts: 40
Liked 3 Times on 3 Posts



EDIT: Conclusion: Extracted tannins from steeping my grains at a temperature way too high.

My first batch has a very crisp, dry taste. It tastes really good, definitely gonna drink all this batch but it leaves your mouth a bit dry.

What causes that? Fermentation temps too high? What should I be aiming for in the middle of the wort? Side of the fermenter? I'm building a fermentation chamber right now so temps won't be a problem for the next batch.

Thanks!

 
Reply With Quote
Old 07-22-2014, 09:30 PM   #2
flars
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Recipes 
 
May 2011
Medford, WI
Posts: 6,974
Liked 1177 Times on 979 Posts


What are the particulars of your brew?

 
Reply With Quote
Old 07-22-2014, 09:36 PM   #3
cheezydemon3
Registered User
Recipes 
 
Nov 2009
louisville
Posts: 12,960
Liked 1672 Times on 1251 Posts


"Dry" means "Not Sweet"

Is that what you mean? It almost sounded like your brew dried your mouth out.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 07-22-2014, 09:41 PM   #4
WayFrae
Homebrew Enthusiast
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
 
WayFrae's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Feb 2014
Salt Lake City, Utah
Posts: 1,249
Liked 182 Times on 149 Posts


It sounds to me like tannins. Tannins will leave your mouth dry feeling. Like that feeling tea gives your mouth. I believe a too high of a mash pH will extract tannins from the grain.
__________________
Primary: Empty :(
Secondary: Simple Cider
Kegged: Baltic Porter | Rye Stout 3.0 | Triple Threat Double IPA
Bottled: Rodeo Clown RyePA | Rye Stout | Robust Porter | Nut Brown Ale

 
Reply With Quote
Old 07-22-2014, 09:42 PM   #5
Lemontato
 
Lemontato's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Jul 2014
Quebec, QC
Posts: 40
Liked 3 Times on 3 Posts


Quote:
Originally Posted by cheezydemon3 View Post
"Dry" means "Not Sweet"

Is that what you mean? It almost sounded like your brew dried your mouth out.
Hm, it's definitely not sweet. I'm not sure how to explain it, but it does kinda get your mouth dry. I'll upload the recipe in a few seconds.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 07-22-2014, 09:45 PM   #6
Lemontato
 
Lemontato's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Jul 2014
Quebec, QC
Posts: 40
Liked 3 Times on 3 Posts


Here's the recipe, ambient temp was around 70F, 5 days in primary, 10 days in secondary, 2 weeks bottled:




 
Reply With Quote
Old 07-22-2014, 09:51 PM   #7
jfk69
Recipes 
 
Mar 2013
Owosso, Michigan
Posts: 222
Liked 41 Times on 34 Posts


If you fermented at ambient temperature, the actual fermentation temperature was a few degrees higher in all likelihood. Nottingham yeast doesn't like higher temperatures in my experience. With that said, that would probably produce fusels and esters that you would notice. I see the recipe also calls for a tick over a pound of honey. Honey is pretty much 100% fermentable, and is often used to dry a beer out. What did you reach for final gravity (FG) on this beer? It could have attenuated a fair amount, leaving the "dry" or "crisp" taste to your palette.
__________________
Primary #1-Otter Balls Amber
Primary #2- DRIPA clone
Kegged-
Bulk Conditioning-
Serving- Dicken Cider, Cottage House Saison, Nugget Nectar clone, Gorky Park RIS

 
Reply With Quote
Old 07-22-2014, 09:54 PM   #8
Lemontato
 
Lemontato's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Jul 2014
Quebec, QC
Posts: 40
Liked 3 Times on 3 Posts


Quote:
Originally Posted by jfk69 View Post
If you fermented at ambient temperature, the actual fermentation temperature was a few degrees higher in all likelihood. Nottingham yeast doesn't like higher temperatures in my experience. With that said, that would probably produce fusels and esters that you would notice. I see the recipe also calls for a tick over a pound of honey. Honey is pretty much 100% fermentable, and is often used to dry a beer out. What did you reach for final gravity (FG) on this beer? It could have attenuated a fair amount, leaving the "dry" or "crisp" taste to your palette.
FG was 1.012, didn't think to take OG. I'm not sure what fusels / esters taste like, so it might have them.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 07-22-2014, 10:10 PM   #9
WayFrae
Homebrew Enthusiast
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
 
WayFrae's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Feb 2014
Salt Lake City, Utah
Posts: 1,249
Liked 182 Times on 149 Posts


What temperature did you steep the grains at? To me it sounds like you extracted tannins from the specialty grains by steeping at too high of a temperature.
__________________
Primary: Empty :(
Secondary: Simple Cider
Kegged: Baltic Porter | Rye Stout 3.0 | Triple Threat Double IPA
Bottled: Rodeo Clown RyePA | Rye Stout | Robust Porter | Nut Brown Ale

 
Reply With Quote
Old 07-22-2014, 10:16 PM   #10
Lemontato
 
Lemontato's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Jul 2014
Quebec, QC
Posts: 40
Liked 3 Times on 3 Posts


Quote:
Originally Posted by WayFrae View Post
What temperature did you steep the grains at? To me it sounds like you extracted tannins from the specialty grains by steeping at too high of a temperature.
Around 175 F I believe, maybe a bit higher, didn't have a thermometer on hand.

 
Reply With Quote
Reply
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
New York Tri clover parts FS 1/2"-3/4" clamps, 2"MPTx2.5" TC adapter, 2.5" gaskets, & 3" valve WPStrassburg For Sale 0 01-05-2014 05:18 AM
Flavorful "Small" or "Session" beer. Less base malt? killsurfcity All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing 9 04-22-2012 01:25 PM
Maybe stupid question, but what makes a beer a "double" or "triple" beer? damdaman General Beer Discussion 40 03-21-2012 03:34 AM
Beer Smith Software - Hops "Boil" or "Aroma"? FensterBos Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 2 07-02-2011 05:13 PM
When does beer stop tasting "green"? Pugilist Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 11 02-22-2008 04:02 AM


Forum Jump