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Old 06-13-2014, 09:20 PM   #41
zwiller
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I added .2g gypsum. Target was around 600ppm sulfate. Already had 350ppm in there from what I brewed with. Hopefully I was close...

 
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Old 06-17-2014, 03:35 AM   #42
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anyone have any ht to send to ward labs? you know you can have finished beer tested right?

 
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Old 06-18-2014, 10:10 AM   #43
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PlinyTheMiddleAged View Post
I started a thread some time ago after watching that Kimmich video (http://youtu.be/LdfySDN2mF0) where he discussed mash pH. Here it is: http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f128/mash-ph-465320/

I ended up doing two things - one easy thing and one hard thing. The hard thing I did was to brew to "identical" one gallon IPAs where the only thing that I adjusted was the mash pH. One batch had a mash pH of about 5.3 and the second had a mash pH of 5.4. My brew partner and I agreed that the 5.4 batch was the hands down favorite of the two - it wasn't even close.

The easier thing that I did was to email Kimmich about his pH recommendation - was he referencing pH at mash temperatures or at room temperatures (like most homebrewers do). He wrote back saying that his pH statements were referenced to mash temps. Therefore, is recommendations end up being in line with the homebrewers' standard of a pH of 5.4.

I'm curious though about the hardness/sulfate levels that folks are looking at here...
Did you also measure pre-boil kettle pH? This is the key measurement for hops...most of them go into the kettle. Different sparging techniques will result in different pre-boil kettle pH.
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Old 06-21-2014, 01:03 PM   #44
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I always acidified sparge from the days of Dave Miller. He advocated 5.7. I feel it was the reason my beers were always better than my friends'. They were always freaked out by acid, I was intrigued and understood the science...

Took a break from brewing since it was so time consuming. Came back after learning of batch sparging and unfortunately was under the impression I didn't need to acidify sparge with the new technique. Brewed a bunch of less than spectacular beers. Bought a new pH meter (my 3rd) and measured sparging and immediately went back to acidifying sparge. (first runnings were 5.8 and 2nd were over 6) Since the days of Bru'n water I started to acidify sparge to the pH of the mash. No need to measure preboil pH...

 
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Old 06-21-2014, 08:25 PM   #45
PlinyTheMiddleAged
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dstar26t View Post
Did you also measure pre-boil kettle pH? This is the key measurement for hops...most of them go into the kettle. Different sparging techniques will result in different pre-boil kettle pH.

The measurements were of the mash pH only. I kind of got lost in the mash process and didn't measure the pre-boil pH. However, both batches were dunk sparged with treated distilled water (I brew in a bag). I can look up the salt additions if needed - however, they were identical additions for both batches. The only differences were introduced during the mash-in.

 
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Old 06-23-2014, 06:48 PM   #46
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Burton-on-Trent water is often listed as being around 750-820 ppm sulfate, and that is kind of the gold standard for water for English IPAs and bitters. e.g.:

How to Brew 1st Edition - mash pH

I think there's a Zymurgy article (Jan/Feb 2014?) where Martin Brungard points out that this water was likely diluted for use in brewing in Burton-on-Trent, but there's a fair few brewers who have tried to use that original Burton well water profile undiluted. It's quite plausible that Heady Topper uses that profile.

But as mentioned upthread, that number could just be for the mash liquor, with the sparge liquor being much lower in sulfate, giving a more normal profile around 350 ppm sulfate in the boil kettle.

 
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Old 06-23-2014, 11:36 PM   #47
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dyqik View Post
Burton-on-Trent water is often listed as being around 750-820 ppm sulfate, and that is kind of the gold standard for water for English IPAs and bitters. e.g.:

How to Brew 1st Edition - mash pH

I think there's a Zymurgy article (Jan/Feb 2014?) where Martin Brungard points out that this water was likely diluted for use in brewing in Burton-on-Trent, but there's a fair few brewers who have tried to use that original Burton well water profile undiluted. It's quite plausible that Heady Topper uses that profile.

But as mentioned upthread, that number could just be for the mash liquor, with the sparge liquor being much lower in sulfate, giving a more normal profile around 350 ppm sulfate in the boil kettle.
I think these are great points. I just have one theoretical question about the Burton on Trent water. What would the brewers have used to dilute their water all those years ago?

 
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Old 06-24-2014, 01:44 PM   #48
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brewski09 View Post
I think these are great points. I just have one theoretical question about the Burton on Trent water. What would the brewers have used to file their water all those years ago?
They could have boiled it to drop a fair percentage of the hardness out of it.
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Old 06-24-2014, 02:01 PM   #49
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Maybe sand filter, or distillation?

 
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Old 06-24-2014, 02:44 PM   #50
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brewski09 View Post
I think these are great points. I just have one theoretical question about the Burton on Trent water. What would the brewers have used to file their water all those years ago?
By the way, what did you intend the 'file' word to be?

I take it that you didn't get a chance to read that Zymurgy article? The essence of the article was that the very mineralized water seeps upward from the deep aquifer into the shallow aquifer. All the breweries in Burton are near the Trent River. When those breweries pump a lot of water from their shallow wells, the mineralized water is diluted by inflow from the river. So the levels of ions in their brewing liquor were lower than some of the historic references report.

 
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