National Homebrew Day Giveaway - Enter Now - Weekend Giveaway!

Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Bottling/Kegging > Do I need to read the FAQ again?
Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 12-08-2007, 11:49 PM   #1
Poindexter
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Poindexter's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: interior Alaska
Posts: 1,210
Liked 4 Times on 4 Posts

Default Do I need to read the FAQ again?

What if I don't like force carbed beer and want to prime with corn sugar after all? Can I put the beer back under an airlock to go flat and then prime, or will I have to suck down five gallons?
Poindexter is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 12-09-2007, 12:21 AM   #2
Professor Frink
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Professor Frink's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: San Diego, CA
Posts: 3,106
Liked 15 Times on 15 Posts

Default

I'm assuming it is already in a keg. You can let the CO2 come out of solution then add priming sugar (about 1/2 cup for bulk priming I believe) and let it naturally carbonate. You don't really need an airlock, just vent the keg every once in a while until it's flat.
__________________
Primary: Cherrywood Smoked Porter
60 Minute IPA
Secondary:
On tap:Amber Ale
Milk Stout

Lagering:


http://www.lazydogbrewery.com
Professor Frink is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 12-09-2007, 12:25 AM   #3
malkore
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
malkore's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Nebraska
Posts: 6,922
Liked 34 Times on 32 Posts
Likes Given: 9

Default

just remember that even if you prime a keg using sugar, you still have to use CO2 to dispense the beer, or it gets a little flatter after each pint.
__________________
Malkore
Primary: English Mild
On tap: Pale Ale, Lancelot's Wheat, English Brown Ale, Steam Beer, HoovNuts IPA
Bottled: MOAM, Braggot, Raspberry Melomel, Merlot, Apfelwein, Pyment, Sweet mead, Cabernet
Gal in 2009: 27, Gal in 2010: 34, Gal in 2011: 13, Gal in 2012: 10
malkore is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 12-09-2007, 12:26 AM   #4
Drunkensatyr
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Drunkensatyr's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Posts: 2,017
Liked 7 Times on 3 Posts

Default

What did you find wrong with it?
Did you let it age still? green beer is green beer.
Drunkensatyr is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 12-09-2007, 01:01 AM   #5
Poindexter
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Poindexter's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: interior Alaska
Posts: 1,210
Liked 4 Times on 4 Posts

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Drunkensatyr
What did you find wrong with it?
Did you let it age still? green beer is green beer.
No, no, not like that. I just got my kegs last night, got new O-rings at the LHBS today, I have had a pale ale sitting in secondary for three weeks after one in primary... racked today.

I decided I am going to try force carbonating this one. Hopefully I will like it. Seems like ~most~ people like force carbing good enough but ~a few~ posters here still prime with sugar and use CO2 just to dispense.

Can't start force carbing until I get a wrench big enough to tighten the regulator gently to the CO2 tank, but I am on my way.
Poindexter is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 12-09-2007, 05:02 AM   #6
FlyGuy
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
FlyGuy's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Calgary, Alberta
Posts: 3,618
Liked 149 Times on 43 Posts
Likes Given: 7

Default

Personally, I think the force carb vs. natural carb taste difference is a pure myth. If you want to be purist, you can prime with sugar and serve from a siphon. But there aren't many other reasons to prime a keg.

Some downsides:
- extra yeast in the keg to deal with
- may take longer (depending on how much viable yeast is left in your beer)
- you have less control than force carbing (with a CO2 tank, you can purposefully undershoot your target carb volume, and then slowly increase it until it is jjjuuusssstttt right -- impractical to do this with priming sugar)
- doesn't taste any better than force carbing
FlyGuy is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 12-09-2007, 05:56 AM   #7
Orfy
For the love of beer!
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Orfy's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Cheshire, England
Posts: 11,853
Liked 74 Times on 55 Posts
Likes Given: 30

Default

Listen to:

12-06-07 Basic Brewing Radio - Cask Conditioning

That should help.
__________________
GET THE GOBLIN
Have a beer on me.
Orfy is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 12-09-2007, 03:23 PM   #8
malkore
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
malkore's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Nebraska
Posts: 6,922
Liked 34 Times on 32 Posts
Likes Given: 9

Default

the only time force carbing will affect flavor, is if you rapid force carb....i.e. 30psi and shaking the crap out of the keg.
that leaves behind a lot of carbonic acid, which leaves a 'bite' in the flavor. it WILL fade over the course of a few days.

if you just carb by setting at serving psi (assuming your system has tap lines balanced for this) then after about 10-14 days its fully carb'd with no carbonic acid bite.

i see no reason to rapid force carb unless you run out of beer during a party and your second keg isn't carb'd up. otherwise, you didn't rush through primary, or secondary, so why rush the carbing....carbonation doesn't cure green beer
__________________
Malkore
Primary: English Mild
On tap: Pale Ale, Lancelot's Wheat, English Brown Ale, Steam Beer, HoovNuts IPA
Bottled: MOAM, Braggot, Raspberry Melomel, Merlot, Apfelwein, Pyment, Sweet mead, Cabernet
Gal in 2009: 27, Gal in 2010: 34, Gal in 2011: 13, Gal in 2012: 10
malkore is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 12-09-2007, 05:12 PM   #9
Funkenjaeger
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Funkenjaeger's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Nashua, NH
Posts: 1,637
Liked 9 Times on 7 Posts

Default

The vast majority of commercial beer is force carbed - and for that matter, I believe it's very rapidly force carbed by injecting CO2 through a carbonation stone (or similar) in-line while the beer is being transferred - but do you find that you don't like commercial beers because of this?

Personally, I agree with FlyGuy, I think the claims of differences are all a myth - CO2 is CO2! While I do believe that there may be some difference immediately after rapidly force carbing (like malkore suggests), any difference will fade within a matter of a couple of days - and even when you take into account the extra time to let it "smooth out", if you even find it necessary, it'll likely STILL take less time than naturally carbonating.
Funkenjaeger is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 12-09-2007, 06:49 PM   #10
bradsul
Flyfisherman/brewer
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
bradsul's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Ontario, Canada
Posts: 4,908
Liked 23 Times on 21 Posts
Likes Given: 4

Default

I naturally carbonate my kegs because I don't see it as a major hassle - certainly not one worth spending another $100CAD on a second tank and another $50CAD on another regulator (plus disconnects et al).

I agree there is no taste difference however, I force carbed a couple kegs at room temperature (kegerator only holds 2 and those are both for serving) and as long as you give it time to properly condition it makes no difference.
__________________
Brad
Canadian Brewers Unite!


Projects: Sylvania Kegerator Conversion, Tower Cooling, Grain Milling Station
bradsul is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Can you read this?? wildwest450 General Chit Chat 26 08-04-2009 12:15 AM
Fun read... Duckfoot General Chit Chat 0 08-01-2009 07:08 PM
Thats why I read chickenlips General Chit Chat 4 12-31-2007 12:13 AM
What to read first? mgladstonez General Techniques 3 01-26-2007 12:57 PM


Forum Jump

Newest Threads

LATEST SPONSOR DEALS