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Old 04-22-2014, 07:08 PM   #11
cavemanbrews
 
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I agree with you Conman. entered it into the Blue Bonnet Brew Off and one of the judges had that comment about the nuttiness also.

 
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Old 04-22-2014, 07:55 PM   #12
bzwyatt
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Oohh that's something I'm hoping for, nice!

 
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Old 04-22-2014, 08:37 PM   #13
Conman13
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It's probably one of my favorite of the British yeast strains.

 
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Old 03-20-2015, 05:22 PM   #14
ImNoExpert
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Sorry to revive a thread from the boneyard, but I'm brewing a bitter this weekend and picked up 1275 to use. As far as temperature range goes, has anyone noticed flavor differences if fermented at the higher end of the range vs. lower?

I usually ferment around 65 and bump up to 70 for the final quarter of fermentation, but since this is my first English style ale, I want to make sure I don't do something undesirable to my yeasty overlords and produce a good representation of the beer.
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Old 03-20-2015, 05:38 PM   #15
douglasbarbin
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ImNoExpert View Post
Sorry to revive a thread from the boneyard, but I'm brewing a bitter this weekend and picked up 1275 to use. As far as temperature range goes, has anyone noticed flavor differences if fermented at the higher end of the range vs. lower?

I usually ferment around 65 and bump up to 70 for the final quarter of fermentation, but since this is my first English style ale, I want to make sure I don't do something undesirable to my yeasty overlords and produce a good representation of the beer.
I used it for a one gallon batch I made that was basically a glorified starter. It was a Pale Ale with 100% LME and Nelson Sauvin hops. I let it sit at ambient temperature in my kitchen, which is right at 70 degrees. The yeast seemed relatively clean, even at that temperature.

 
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Old 02-24-2016, 11:03 AM   #16
unclebrazzie
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Just used it in a 1.055 OG porter. Pitched a 1 liter lively starter which I made from a mason jar of slurry.
Kicked off immediately, and finished 2 days later at 1.014. Fermented at 18°C.

What struck me though is pronounced icky fumes it produces. Poo, really. Not so off-putting it refrained me from tasting my gravity sample (I'm ok, really, and so was the taste) but decidedly unpleasant.
I'm sure the smell will disappear over time during maturation. Had similar experiences with Safale Abbaye, which was supersulphury in primary but came out alright in the end.

 
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